12 audiobooks I’ve thoroughly enjoyed this fall

12 audiobooks I’ve thoroughly enjoyed this fall

I’m not entirely sure what happened: I don’t think I’ve been walking more, or folding more laundry, or doing any of the other tasks I tend to pair with audiobook listening. What I do know is I’ve been listening to A TON of audiobooks this season—and so many of them have been so good! Because so many readers are always on the hunt for not just good reads but good listens, I thought it would be fun to share an assortment of what I’ve been enjoying lately in that format.

When it comes to a great listening experience, I’m looking for a great story, well told. I personally prefer fiction on audio (though I’m currently listening to Bill Bryson’s The Body: A Guide for Occupants). I love lush descriptions and atmospheric settings, and a fast-moving plot is a plus (though not a requirement) in this format. And I prefer my audiobooks to be on the short side: 7-10 hours is my sweet spot, though one of my recent listens was nearly 18 hours!

If you’re new to audiobooks or haven’t tried them yet, it may be reassuring to hear that I’m a convert to the medium. My changing listening habits are reflected on the blog: click here for all our audiobook posts. For more discussions about audiobooks in general and specific titles that are excellent in this format, we also created a podcast playlist for you: click here for the What Should I Read Next playlist for audiobook- focused episodes.

12 recent audiobook listening experiences I highly recommend

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Kitchens of the Great Midwest: A Novel

Kitchens of the Great Midwest: A Novel

Author:
One of our winter book selections for the Modern Mrs Darcy Book Club! Last year, I loved listening to Stradal's second novel, The Lager Queen of Minnesota, so I thought I'd enjoy his debut in this audio format, too, as narrated by Amy Ryan and Michael Stuhlbarg. Please, I beg you, don’t read the jacket copy! I enjoyed it more by not knowing very much going into it. Stradal’s novel-in-stories spans more than thirty years and takes us to half as many kitchens, introducing us to fancy chefs and Lutheran church ladies, portraying the food of a region and the unlikely threads that bind us, with a satisfying, full-circle ending. More info →
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The Lost Queen: A Novel

The Lost Queen: A Novel

Author:
Described as "Outlander meets Camelot," this fantasy novel works really well on audio. I appreciated hearing the pronunciation of the Ancient Scottish names and places, as read by Toni Frutin. The "lost queen" is Languoreth, a real sixth century Scottish queen whose twin brother inspired the legend of Merlin. The setting and tone made for a moody and escapist fall reading experience. Ancient magic, complex politics, and clashing religions all conspire to create an intriguing story. Reminiscent of the Arthurian legends, this book is perfect for fans of Phillippa Gregory. More info →
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Clap When You Land

Clap When You Land

I'm pretty sure I've mentioned my tendency to reread via audiobooks on the blog before. This is the perfect example. I read it on paper first, but when it came time to prep for our MMD Book Club conversation with Elizabeth Acevedo, I wanted to listen to her read me the story. Liz dedicates this novel in verse to the memory of the lives lost on American Airlines flight 587, the passenger flight that crashed en route to Santo Domingo from JFK on November 12, 2001. Taking this historical event as her leaping off point, she tells the story of two teenage girls—one in New York, one in Santo Domingo—who are shocked to discover they are sisters in the aftermath of the crash, when the truth of their father’s double life was unceremoniously revealed. The girls tentatively bond as they explore the pain—and love—they share. More info →
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Binti

Binti

Author:
This one also makes an appearance on WSIRN Ep 256: The perks and pitfalls of omnivorous reading. The Binti trilogy, winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards, sat on my To Be Read list for too long before I finally listened to the audiobook edition by widely-loved narrator Robin Miles. This novella drops you right into another galaxy where Binti is the first of her people to receive an offer to attend Oomza University, basically an ivy league college. Accepting the offer requires a huge sacrifice and a treacherous journey. I sped through this quick audiobook thanks to excellent narration and a propulsive plot. More info →
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Actress

Actress

Author:
After retuning this book to the library, unread, a reading friend told me it was fabulous on audio, so I downloaded it in that format instead. This reflective and often pained retrospective examines a complex mother-daughter relationship. Daughter Norah's musings are prompted by a graduate student who comes calling, seeking insight into the life of her mother, the brilliant Irish actress Katherine O'Dell. The style is almost—but not quite—stream of consciousness, as Norah examines her mother's early years as an actress, her sudden and enduring fame, and then her encroaching mental illness. I loved this book for its voice: Norah is a remarkable narrator of her mother's story, and I loved the sly way she lets her own story slip into the frame. Anne Enright is equally remarkable: very few novelists narrate their own audiobooks, but Enright reads hers here in an incredible performance. More info →
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Don’t Look for Me

Don’t Look for Me

Author:
I loved the premise of this brand-new psychological thriller: on a dark and stormy night, a guilt-ridden mother walks away from her life, five years to the day after her youngest child was killed in a tragic accident. Two days after she disappears, police find Molly's handwritten note in a local motel: it says the pain is too much to bear, her family will be better off without her, she's leaving. "Don't look for me," she writes. The police call it a walk-away, saying it happens all the time. But Molly's daughter is suspicious and begins her own investigation into her mother's disappearance. Fan favorite narrator Therese Plummer reads. More info →
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Monogamy

Monogamy

Author:
Miller is a prolific writer, but this was my first time reading her work. It's a sad, wistful, reflective literary story about marriage, happiness, and family. Graham and Annie have a strong 30 year marriage. Graham owns a bookstore, and this is a fun thread throughout the novel because much of the couples' life revolves around bookstore events (they met at an author event!). Early in the book—this is not a spoiler—Graham suddenly dies. This prompts Annie to reflect on their life together, and in the process she trips over new information about him and their life together, causing her to question the very foundations of their relationship. Read by the author. More info →
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Dating-ish

Dating-ish

Author:
This was my first time listening to a Penny Reid book, but I've read a bunch of her sweet and funny romance novels. Over the last few months, Reid's books have been go-to comfort reading. I really liked this Knitting in the City series installment that centers on journalist Marie Harris, who swears off dating after a disastrous first date. But then things do NOT go as planned, setting Marie down a path that's personally and professionally rewarding—until she reaches the crisis point. Marie is a delightful, relatable protagonist, and I couldn't stop listening to her story, breezing through it in a ridiculously short span of time. Heads up for some open-door moments. Random note: I loved Joy Nash's narration, but she repeatedly pronounced just one word in a way that sounded funny to my ear. Has this ever happened to you? (The word was "glower," which the narrator pronounced to rhyme with "mower." I checked Merriam Webster, and technically it's a correct-but-unusual pronunciation; it didn't ruin the book for me by any means, but it was distracting.) More info →
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Songs for the End of the World

Songs for the End of the World

Author:
I recently recommended this eerily prescient pandemic novel about a coronavirus pandemic (really) to Cliff in WSIRN Ep 256: The perks and pitfalls of omnivorous reading. I enjoyed it on audio and would love to own a print copy, but for mysterious reasons, the U.S. publication date on this book is now on hold. It is available for Canadian readers (or readers willing to pay international shipping). I avoided all pandemic-related books for a while, but this story of resilience and hope struck just the right notes for me. Narrated by a full cast including Alex Payton-Beesley, Amelia Sargisson, and more. More info →
You Had Me at Hola

You Had Me at Hola

Author:
A fresh, fun, and flirty new romance novel about a soap opera star and a telenovela hunk who are both trying to catch their big break with their brand new bilingual TV show. Jasmine and her sisters come up with some rules to guide her on the path to success, calling it the "Leading Lady Plan." One principle: "leading ladies do not rebound with their co-stars." This shouldn't be difficult. Ashton is banking on this new series to make his career, too. He's perfectly professional...but of course, despite their reluctance to let romance get in the way of their dreams, these two can't deny their chemistry. Heads up for a few spicy scenes and open door moments. Narrated by Seraphine Valentine. More info →
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Goodnight Beautiful

Goodnight Beautiful

Author:
A brand new mystery from author of The Perfect Mother . This twisty domestic thriller made me stop in several places and go “wait, what?” Molloy skillfully shifts the point of view, making you question all the assumptions you had about what was happening in the story. We meet the main characters, Sam and Annie, as newlyweds moving to upstate New York. Sam is a therapist who practices from home, where Annie happens to overhear just about every session. When a mysterious French girl shows up, the happy couple's blissful future takes a turn. I especially enjoyed the frequent West Wing references (that's my quarantine show of choice), plus a strong connection to Misery by Stephen King. The audiobook features multiple narrators, including George Newbern and Marin Ireland. (Funny story: at first I thought one of the voice actors was cast ALL WRONG for the character ... but I changed my mind as I kept listening.) More info →
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The Thursday Murder Club

The Thursday Murder Club

Author:
This fun mystery reminded me so much of Angela Lansbury and Murder She Wrote, and holds appeal for readers aged 18 to 80-something and beyond. Plus, it looks like the first in what will be a series! It's set in a retirement community, where four friends meet in the Jigsaw Room every week to chat about unsolved crimes. This group of 70-somethings call themselves "The Thursday Murder Club." When bodies start piling up in a live and local case, they set out to catch a killer. Completely charming, and so well-narrated by Lesley Manville. Bonus points for Britishisms and a lovely accent to listen to. More info →
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What have you been listening to lately? Fill up our audiobook TBR lists in the comments.

P.S. Tis the season for spine-tingling mysteries. Get hooked on a new mystery series with these 10 addicting audiobooks. Many of these not-too-dark mysteries also work well on audio.

P.P.S Y’all LOVE audiobooks. Here are 15 of your favorite narrators, plus 35 books they narrate.

12 highly recommended audiobooks

more posts you might enjoy

106 comments | Comment

106 comments

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  1. Sarah says:

    Thanks for the list! I’m exactly the opposite: I prefer to listen to nonfiction. I just finished Bill Bryson’s “A Walk in the Woods” and loved it. Would you be able to make a list of your favorite nonfiction audiobooks? Thanks!

    • Anne says:

      I’ve done nonfiction favorite audiobooks for specific years before but not a general list, although there are several superlative audiobook memoir posts. That’s a fun idea!

    • Stacie says:

      @Sarah SAME! I really prefer nonfiction for my audiobooks. And anytime someone mentions A Walk in the Woods, I hear “Flung!” in my head. LOL

      • Virginia Westlake says:

        Along with A Walk in the Woods, you would love The Road to Little Dribbling and In a Sunburned Country. I laughed out loud with all of these.

        • Carol Quan says:

          I listened to all of these. Love Bill Bryson! You learn so much and he has a great sense of humor. I recently listened to I’m A Stranger Here Myself, but that one was written in the 90s and was pretty dated.I might see if I can find another one on Libby now.

    • sarah says:

      I listened to that one on audio a few years ago, and it literally made me laugh out loud while I was walking my dog in the neighborhood!

    • Jaia says:

      I also prefer non-fiction audio books and I must recommend Mudlark by Laura Maiklem to anyone looking for a charming, soothing, non-fiction read. She hunts for old “treasures” like 1700’s buttons or Roman pottery in the mud of the Thames and shares their histories.

    • Mariah Hanley says:

      If you want a few recommendations before Anne makes that list (which I’d also love!):

      Prairie Fires, about the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder. It’s long, but I listened entirely on audio (I often switch back and forth for nonfiction) and would listen to it for hours at a time.

      Call the Midwife. I’ve never seen the show, but loved this anyway. The author makes the accents of the midwives come to life.

      Any Erik Larson book- I’ve only listened to them and love them, with one exception . My personal favorite is Dead Wake, about the sinking of the Luisitania. For nonfiction, it felt like an action and adventure book at parts. My least favorite by him is Devil in the White City. I know, I know. Just was not for me at all.

      There are also a bunch of memoirs I’ve loved on audio but tbh most of them I listened to because Anne recommended them so I’d go look at those posts! Don’t remember if she mentioned these: Becoming by Michelle Obama, The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates, and The World as It Is by Ben Rhodes.

      • Ann says:

        Mariah—The Devil in the White City had been on my TBR list since it was published: Chicago, World’s Fair, well known author—what’s not to love? Then I actually started reading it. What?! No, thank you, this story is not for me- at all!!

  2. Rachel says:

    Perfect timing for this post! I finished Winter Counts last night and am waiting for other library holds to come in! Since the pandemic began I’ve been mostly listening to audiobooks, I found it difficult to concentrate when reading but listening to a story is so comforting so when things were so stressful I found it to be a wonderful escape.

  3. Stacey Larson says:

    I have also been gobbling up audiobooks in the past few months. I think it’s because my middle-aged eyes sometimes find reading tiring. I just finished A Study in Scarlet Sisters by Sherry Waters and recommend it for Anglophiles who also love a new take on a classic. Inspired by the Sherlock Holmes origin story, A Study in Scarlet, the reader is transported back to Gilded Age London and follows Charlotte Holmes as she strikes out on her own for a life lived on her terms. I enjoyed the way the author intertwined the original but also created a new world and characters. And there are more in the series!

  4. Tracie R says:

    I don’t typically listen to non-fiction audiobooks either, but I just finished “The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper.” It was fascinating and upsetting and thought provoking. It took me longer than when I listen to fiction, because I listened for a while and then listened to fiction, then went back to this. The narrator’s accent is great, and I enjoyed it in this format. As much as you can “enjoy” a book on this topic!

    “Bonds of Brass” by Emily Skrutsie was great on audio — James Fouhey is now one of my favorite narrators based on this first experience with him!! Really fun, adventurous space opera.

    “Boyfriend Material” is one of my favorite books of the year. The narration is SOOOOO GOOD!! It’s really good in print as well, but this is a MUST LISTEN!

  5. Jane E Kunhardt says:

    The Potato Factory by Australian author Bryce Courtenay … supposedly the character Ikey Solomon was the inpsiration for Dickens’ Fagin.

    Becoming Duchess Goldblatt great narration (with appearance of the real Lyle Lovett adding his voice to the narration)

    • Anne says:

      I’ve read Bryce Courtenay before but am unfamiliar with that title—thank you for sharing.

      And that is TOO FUN that Lyle Lovett sings in Becoming Duchess Goldblatt! That sounds like it may be a good use of my next audiobook credit. 🙂

      • Jane E Kunhardt says:

        Lyle doesn’t sing … he’s a big part of the “plot”.
        As for Potato Factory, it’s part 1 of a trilogy which involves the early settlers of Van Diemen’s Land (aka Tasmania). Found it when I Googled “really long audiobooks”! Starts off in Victorian London with Ikey, his wife and his “mistress” and how they end up being transported to VDL. So good that my 4 mile walks grew to 6 miles!!!

  6. Susan King says:

    I just finished listening to The Green Ember series by S. D. Smith. It’s a middle grade (don’t judge me) series about a group of valiant rabbits. The narrator, Joel Clarkson, might be the best narrator I’ve ever listened to. And I listen to a lot of audiobooks!

  7. Kate in Minnesota says:

    I am listening to Circe right now, and it has me hooked. I didn’t think it would work well on audio book (aren’t there a LOT of greek gods to keep track of?!), but it is completely enthralling. The story moves quickly, through thousands of years and the narrator is amazing.

    • Irene Marks says:

      I listened to Circe but actually enjoyed Madeline Miller’s first boom Song of Achilles, even more. It was great on audio .

  8. Claire says:

    The Thursday Murder Club was my first EVER audiobook listen and I loved it. The short chapters really eased me in to the format. It was a pleasant, funny and touching read and I also enjoyed the bonus interview with Richard and Marian Keyes that was included at the end of my audiobook.

  9. Jill C says:

    I enjoy listening to non-fiction on audio, especially when read by author. Currently listening to Untamed & just finished Everything Beautiful in Its Time and Unbecoming.

    • Denise Amos says:

      I am finishing Strangers, written and read my Malcolm Gladwell. He has made the audio even better by having the people he interviews, read their quotes. It fascinating.

  10. Heather Scott says:

    Great list, Anne! If you haven’t read the Winston Brothers series by Penny Reid put it on your Atbr (A standing for audio). The narrators are fantastic and the bearded brothers will capture your heart. I have two left and I can’t bring myself to listen to to them. I’m saving them for a metaphoric rainy day I suppose. 💜

    • Kate in Minnesota says:

      I haven’t tried these on audiobook – but I’ve been devouring them in print. You’re right – the brothers do capture your heart.

    • Alicia says:

      I loved all the Winston brothers books and have moved on to the Jen and Cletus mysteries. I’ll have to go back and try one in audio 😁

  11. Traci says:

    I recently listened to The Night Circus and really enjoyed the fantastical world! I had a hard time getting into the written version, so tried the audiobook which worked well. It’s read by Jim Dale who added so much to the experience.

  12. Laurel A McFatridge says:

    My first audiobook is still one of my favorites

    I loved Ann Patchett “State of Wonder”

    The lush descriptions and excellent narration completely transported me!

  13. Hadar Makov says:

    I’m currently listening to Maggie O’Farrell’s Hamnet and it’s absolutely mesmerizing, the language is beautiful, dreamy and slightly dark at the same time if that makes sense.

    • Claire Long says:

      Hello there Hadar
      If you loved Hamnet try the audio of The Binding by Bridget Collins. The narrator is a British actor and he does an amazing job. It has become my favourite book of all time and loved by my young adult daughters as well.

  14. Sarah Jeter says:

    I love True Grit by Charles Portia on audio. It is narrated by Donna Tartt. Her love of the book really shines through!

  15. Margaret says:

    “Echo” by Paula Muñoz Ryan is exceptional on audio. Music plays a big role in the story and it is added into the audio version. I don’t think it would be quite as good without it. I believe it is a middle grade novel, but beautiful all the same.

  16. I’m a non-fiction audiobook fan. When I really want to study a book, I love to have it in both audiobook and print version. Probably the best I’ve listened to is The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. The narration is SUPERB. But I found myself so taken by the book that when my book club read it I also bought it in paperback so that I wouldn’t miss a thing.

    Otherwise, I tend to love to listen to books read by the author. One recent superlative listen was The Deeply Formed Life by Rich Villodas. I will say that, after recording the audiobook version of my own book, I have new appreciation for audiobook narrators!

  17. Steph Marvin says:

    In October I listened to my fall favorites – The Discovery of Witches trilogy by Deborah Harkness, The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova, The Distant Hours by Kate Morton and The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield. I’m finding rereading & relistening to favorites very comforting this year.

  18. Kate says:

    I usually have a hard time concentrating on audio books but really enjoyed Daisy Jones & The Six on audio! Excited to add some of these to my list.

  19. Alison says:

    In the year of the comfort read, anything that evokes a reference to Murder She Wrote is definitely going on my list.
    Thanks for the recommendation of The Thursday Murder Club 😊

  20. Stephanie says:

    I was in the Jane Eyre buddy read group and listened to it on audio. The version read by Thandie Newton was so good! She is amazing and I want her to narrate all of my books now!

  21. Liz Snell says:

    Oldie but goodie: Busman’s Honeymoon read by Ian Carmichael
    I’m currently obsessing on anything read by Shane East (warning: VERY hot, open door)
    Also love Penny Reid’s Winston bros. read by Chris Brinkley
    And I too really enjoy listening to a book I’ve already read. I am being soothed by these voices, and these other places & problems. The best escape!

  22. Mariah Hanley says:

    I strongly recommend Burial Rites! It’s historical fiction set in 19th century Iceland, and hearing the names of the farms and people pronounced made the book so much better. It’s a great book for fall and winter.

    • Eileen Sullivan says:

      Mariah–I loved Burial Rites! I listened to that as well and loved hearing the names of people and places as well as the food pronounced for me. A quietly intense story about a time and place far, far, away.

      • Mariah Hanley says:

        So glad to hear someone else loved it! I adore Iceland- I spent four and a half days there in January, which was incredible, and had also spent two full days there in August 2019. Seeing the scenery of the book in front of me made me love the book that much more.

        Also, if anyone wants to go deep into Iceland nerdiness: Alda Sigmundsdottir wrote a couple of short books about Iceland, including The Little Book of the Icelanders. My family is still hearing me tell them about things I learned in her books ten months after I read it on the plane on the way home.

  23. Debra Benton says:

    This year has been a big year for audiobooks for me too. While I don’t take long walks, I find them great to listen to while I putter or do my puzzles. And since this year has brought more indoor time, I have been puttering a lot more.

    Recently, I listened to Mythos read by author Stephen Frye. Loved it! He has a great delivery, like he is talking to you in conversation. Also listened to Recipe for Persuasion. The narrator was wonderful. And Stamped by Jason Reynolds who reads it. Really interesting (and much shorter than original).

    I agree with Anne and loved reading Clap When You Land and Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo who read them. Beautiful! Also An American Marriage was excellent as an audio.

  24. Tanya says:

    I love audiobooks and a great narrator will often help me expand my reading experiences into a new genre. I have never been a big reader of fantasy novels but I am currently on book three of the Temeraire series by Naomi Novik read by Simon Vance. Looking forward to adding most of your suggestions to my audiobook list. I have subscriptions to Libro.fm and Audible but find most of them available through my local library. Love reading the comments as well to get lots of new ideas!

    • Tanya says:

      I will also frequently check out the physical book along with the audio as I love to see the spelling of names or any photos, maps or illustrations when reading non-fiction in particular. If it’s a page turner, I will also read the physical book before bed. Thank you Anne for always providing great bookish content!

  25. Dawna says:

    I just listened to “The Sound of Gravel: A Memoir,” written and read by Ruth Wariner. It was a fascinating, if disturbing, look into a dysfunctional family (polygamy, sexual abuse). While it was not an easy-to-listen to book, it was so gripping and helped me understand the lives of neglected and abused children.

  26. Barbara Kochick says:

    Knee replacement! Six hours a day prescribed in a perpetual motion machine. Not good for reading a book but perfect for audio. Thanks Anne!

  27. Eileen Sullivan says:

    I prefer fiction, but occasionally will listen to a narrative non fiction (such as Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand.
    Some recent fiction listens that I have recently enjoyed are The Water Dancer, by Ta-Nehesi Coates, narrated by Joe Morton; Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid, narrated by Nicole Lewis (her narration of the little girl was priceless!); and Sometimes a Great Notion by Ken Kesey narrated by Tom Stechschutte.
    I tend to borrow “short” audiobooks from the libary–mysteries, contemporary fiction, etc because I only have them for a short time and purchase classic long form novels (Dickens, Austen, Steinbeck,) from Audible, to get the most bang for my buck (credit).

  28. Erin Wilson says:

    I am in agreement with many on here who prefer audible for nonfiction. Some of my current favorites….The Next Right Thing(helpful for those struggling with decision making), Fear Gone Wild(the story of the wife of a pastor who committed suicide), Never Split the Difference(how to negotiate), Burnout(the idea that burnout is prevalent, especially among women, and what to do about it), and Group(memoir of a woman in group therapy). Enjoy!

  29. Katie says:

    Thank you Anne!! These book lists are life, especially right now with everything being canceled and working from home, I have more time than ever to read. I’m going through books like crazy. I am so happy to add six more books to my TBR. 😊

  30. Beth Werner Lee says:

    HI I’m reading a lot on my library’s audiobook program as I commute: books by Rosaria Butterfield, Ralph Moody, and most recently Mesu Andrews. Thanks for your list!

  31. Sara Baker says:

    I just finished Code Name Helene (from a Modern Mrs. Darcy recommendation, I believe!) and can not recommend it enough. My loan from the library expired when I had only 1.5 chapters left and I couldn’t wait in line to get my audible copy back, so I bought the book from Audible – and I am very picky about what I purchase from Audible!! The story is amazing, and the narrator is fantastic – I will listen to anything narrated by Barrie Kreinik from here on out (and a quick search on Audible shows she narrates a LOT!). It might be one of my favorite listens ever.

  32. Karen O says:

    I really enjoyed listening to ‘Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead’ by Olga Tokarczuk, narrated by Beata Pozniak. Her accent was perfect and she pronounced all the Polish names for me! A really great book, and a great listening experience.

  33. Rebecca Beavers says:

    I can’t find “songs for the end of the world” on audible or my library. How did you access it? I am ready for some more pandemic reading.

  34. Merrill H says:

    I particularly love hearing fantasy and/or books set outside of the U.S. to hear the accent and be more immersed in the world; e.g. Night Circus is my favorite audio book of all time. For anyone else who likes science fiction or did as a kid, did you know that Ender’s Game has been rewritten by Orson Scott Card as an audio play? Available on Audible and quite good. Other favorite audio reads this year: Ocean at the End of the Lane (Neil Gaiman); Untamed (Glennon Doyle – I think I liked it so much more to be able to hear her tone which might come across as preachy just on a page); Angels in America (also audio play on Audible); The Bear and the Nightingale Trilogy (Katherine Arden; read by Kathleen Gati); Uprooted and Spinning Silver (Naomi Novik; read by Julia Emelin). With a tween in the car, we’ve been re-listening to Born a Crime by (and narrated by Trevor Noah) – simply fab and even more interesting now with his recent work on The Daily Show. We’ve also found What If? by Randall Munroe (narrated by Wil Wheaton – who made me love Ready Player One) to be very entertaining for kids and adults alike for shorter around town trips.

  35. Susan says:

    We are Not From Here by Jenny Torres Sanchez was a fantastic audiobook about three teens fleeing violence in Guatemala, trying to make it to the U.S.

    I’m currently listening to This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger. It’s really absorbing, though I feel unsettled about one particular minor character, a Native American. The book is by a white man, and the character seems to be a bit of a stereotype.

  36. I WAS SHOCKED to see Goodnight Beautiful on this list!! I listened to about 30 minutes and simply could NOT with the narrator. It feels soooooo wrong. But I’m guessing I need to give it another shot maybe???

  37. Nicola Jesse says:

    I found a series I am enjoying only on audio-Martin Walker,Author. Inspector
    Bruno Series. All in a small town in France. He not only solves crimes in his municipality also works with French National police units and Cooks. Always hungry after I have listen as I do my daily walks. French recipes, French wine and French countryside-we were in France last year! It is a great get away. Very atmospheric!

  38. Jeanette Pham says:

    I recently devoured, Once We Were Brothers by Ronald Balson. It was a captivating story and a great narrator. I finished it way before my 14 days were up at the library. An accomplishment for me.

  39. Cynthia says:

    I don’t like audible books or podcasts. But these days I find it hard to concentrate enough to read; so, I will give audible a try. I’ll let you know.

  40. Barbara Chase says:

    Just finished “One For the Blackbird One For the Crow” by Olivia Hawker. Beautifully written description of life on the prairie after the end of the Civil War. Great strong female characters and a compelling story

  41. Amy says:

    I just finished listening to the Kenneth Branagh narrated version of Murder on the Orient Express and it was perfection! The accents/inflections he does for each character are so wonderful and he brings Agatha Christie’s work to life so enchantingly! I kept finding excuses to go and do jobs around the house so I could listen to one more chapter!

  42. Yvonne says:

    I have been listening to The Good House by Ann Leary and I LOVE IT. The narrator is 100. I don’t usually enjoy audio unless its non-fiction because I can treat it like a podcast in lots of doses. I don’t know why I do not like reading any other genre on audio normally. I have been loving this one though!

  43. Amy says:

    I was wondering if, Nobody Will Tell You This But Me is good as an audiobook? After listening to WSIRN Episode 252 I was intrigued and thought I might enjoy it on audible (I really like memoirs on audible) but was curious if anyone else had read it in that format?

  44. Sue says:

    My family’s best comfort reads are the No 1 Ladies Detective Agency series wonderfully read by Lisette Lecat—again, getting those pronunciations right makes all the difference!
    My widowed mother has just fallen unexpectedly in love with the Wright Brothers thru an audiobook! She listened to The Wright Brothers, by David McCullough, even though she had ZERO interest in the Wrights or aviation, but she trusted D. McCullough. She said to me: “I’m in love with Will and Orv! They’re so decent and kind! I would marry one of them! Who knew??”
    I”m doing a reread of Peace Like a River on audio, because every page of the book brought a smile to my face. What a GEM!

  45. Valerie says:

    I can’t imagine any other way to say “glower” than to rhyme it with “mower”. Lol.
    I loved The Hate You Give on Audible. And Circe.

    • Kat H. says:

      When I read the word I would always rhyme it with mower. I can’t remember which audiobook I listened to, maybe Jenny Lawson’s, and heard it rhyme with flour.

  46. Julie says:

    I just finished The Guest List by Lucy Foley and would like to propose an audiobook list where the book is narrated by an ensemble cast (which The Guest List was, also along the lines of Daisy Jones and The Six and The Only Plane in the Sky).

    • Carol says:

      Yes! One issue I have when reading audiobooks is having one person do all the voices. It just grates on me. I definitely prefer print form but really want to like audiobooks. After reading these comments I do think I’d be better off with non fiction, but fiction with an ensemble cast i could maybe do.

  47. Janna says:

    I’ve listened to so many this year! The Talon series by Julie Kagawa, The Indigo Girl by Natasha Boyd, 90 Miles To Havana by Enrique Flores-Galbis (read by the author), and The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (and then rereading the original Hunger Games series – but for the first time on audio).

    Currently listening to The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin.

  48. Jennice says:

    I am not a huge fan of audiobooks. I’ve only read two books by the same author, Sejal Badani. I guess something about hearing people have these conversations as opposed to reading added another level to drawing me into the story. I might be tempted to try another one 🤔

  49. Alicia says:

    I got into audiobooks from other posts and comments. And can’t stop listening to them. Good when driving to and from work and when I play this online puzzle game. (Heehee). Listening to Harry Potter made me giddy. I can’t wait to listen to the rest. I am plowing through the Armand Gamache series (another recommendation from here). And am really enjoying a paranormal romance mystery type series that takes place in my home town, by Darynda Jones. First book is called First Grave on the Right.

    Louise Erdrich (an indigenous author) narrates most of her books and she was also quite pleasant

  50. Yvonne Armstrong says:

    I’ve just finished “The Lost Queen” and “The Thursday Murder Club!” Both were wonderful! I loved the interesting take on Arthurian legends and the wonderfully chatty Thursday Murder Club.

  51. Lorna says:

    I love audiobooks, especially these days. Clap When You Land is on my wishlist with Actress and the Sue Miller. I recently loved The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires, The Dutch House (narrated by Tom Hanks) and Writers and Lovers (I think I might have got that one from another one of your posts!). Untamed, by Glennon Doyle was great, too. All of these are like coffee-talk with a friend.

  52. Caron Small says:

    I’ve listened to several great audiobooks this year: Wuthering Heights narrated by Joanne Froggatt (she played Anna in Downton Abbey if that helps anyone!) and she did a fabulous job of all the different characters; Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes, although it took me a few chapters to tune into the narrator’s accent; The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary narrated by Carrie Hope Fletcher and Kwaku Fortune (think this was my favourite audiobook, if not my favourite book of 2020! It made me laugh so much at times that I actually had to stop listening so I could recover!!); Last Bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter which is the first Inspector Morse book and I saw narrated by Samuel West. I also thoroughly enjoyed Charlotte’s Web narrated by the author which I listened to in 2019 I think it was.

  53. Hunter says:

    I have given audiobooks a few tries, but I don’t understand how one can stay focused. I’m happy for everyone else that seem to be able to listen to many books a month, but it doesn’t work for me..no matter how hard I try. Surely, I’m not alone in this. I’ll stick to my kindle reading I guess.

  54. Carol Quan says:

    I actually prefer nonfiction audiobooks. No characters to keep track of in case I get distracted and narrators trying to perform different voices. I listened to Into The Woods, The Body and several other Bill Bryson audiobooks. I love memoirs read by the author. Know My Name and Small Fry were excellent. David Sedaris audiobooks are also great. I loved Clap When You Land (fiction), which is on your list. That was excellent!

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