10 cookbooks to cook through

This cookbook speaks to my minimalist heart. The goal is to create a framework for a streamlined kitchen so that you can create and cook easily throughout the week. As someone who enjoys spending more time in the kitchen on Friday nights or Sunday afternoons, I like the breakdown of "weekday" versus "weekend" recipes.
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
I'm not here to convince anyone to replace their weekly takeout meal (sometimes you just need a break!), but if you do want to cook your favorite Chinese food at home, this cookbook is a great source of delicious recipes. One reader gave it a glowing review: "I cooked my way through <em>Every Grain of Rice</em> by Fuchsia Dunlop. I even bought an actual wok and the tools needed to make it authentic. I loved every minute of it and my family enjoyed most of the recipes. It was such a fun learning experience! I hope I find another cookbook I am that motivated to work my way through."
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
When we discussed cookbooks worth of completely cooking your way through, Indian-ish ranked multiple mentions. Inspired by her mother's creative recipes that combined the traditional Indian recipes of her childhood with American favorites (like spaghetti), Priya Krishna shares fun, everyday recipes that can only be described as "Indian-ish." I'm interested in picking this one up for the stories. I love reading my cookbooks like novels, and Krishna shares funny and endearing family memories in between recipes. This one sounds fun to read and to cook from, making it a great candidate for a cookbook completion project.
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
I was introduced to Kimball’s writing when he was at the helm of <em>Cook’s Illustrated</em>, and I’ve always liked his tone and style. Now editor in chief at <em>Milk Street</em>, he’s probably single handedly responsible for changing the contents of my spice drawer. It’s filled with new additions like sumac powder, coriander seeds, and za'atar. Their goal at Milk Street is to make cooking a part of life-long learning, which I can totally get behind. I’m also smitten with this cookbook title because I feel like I’m constantly making new words by adding (ish) at the end, see: bookish. Cooking through it would be a full hands-on learning experience.
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
Like many cooking enthusiasts, we watched the Netflix series A Chef’s Life, “a show about people, place, tradition and family told through the lens of food.” I’ve since checked out some of Howard’s cookbooks from the library. Her newest, filled with simple recipes sounds like a fun project. She’s insistent that she will CHANGE THE WAY YOU COOK, and that makes me want to pick it up. Of course, the emphasis on "simple" is appealing when you're ready to tackle every single recipe. Bonus: more than half the dishes are vegetarian, gluten-free, or both.
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
This cookbook comes with a built-in challenge: cook every meal for 90 days. Don't worry, leftovers are part of the equation, but the premise is that with home-cooking, you'll feel better, save money, and pick up more skills in the kitchen. The book comes with over 100 recipes and four weeks of meal plans to kick-start your challenge and make deciding what's for dinner a breeze. This comment sold me: "I love the variety of recipes and the fact that almost all of them prepare a family meal rather than just a main dish or side dish. I really dislike having to figure out, now what goes with this dish?"
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
This is a GENIUS idea. I need to ask you for cookbook recommendations and kitchen tips more often! From Meg: "I’ve been baking through the Sister Pie cookbook! Because most of them are dessert pies, I’ve loved baking a new pie for a special occasion or small dinner party gathering. In the book’s margin, I’ve been writing the occasion, who was in attendance, date, and any notes about the night or recipe. For example, I recently made the INCREDIBLE Apple and Sage Pie and included: Dinner party at X’s house with Y, Z, Q. We ended the night carving pumpkins! 5 Star Review all around. I’m excited to have a record of memories of the dinner parties and friends sharing pie when I’m done."
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop
I'd forgotten how good Reichl's food writing is: I loved this so much, I can't even tell you. This collection truly is as much memoir as cookbook: there's a story to accompany every single recipe. (I only made one recipe—the marinated london broil—but it was a hit.) I happened to sit down and read this (like a novel) right after we got back from New York, and I especially loved the copious number of NYC stories: I kept googling Manhattan shops, neighborhoods, and restaurants while reading. I checked this out of the library and I already miss it: this might be a keeper.
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from Bookshop
My Barefoot Contessa cookbooks are well-loved and notably worse for wear. From the publisher: "Ina Garten shares 85 new recipes that will feed your deepest cravings. Many of these dishes are inspired by childhood favorites—but with the volume turned way up, such as Cheddar and Chutney Grilled Cheese sandwiches (the perfect match for Ina’s Creamy Tomato Bisque), Smashed Hamburgers with Caramelized Onions, and the crispiest hash browns that are actually made in a waffle iron! Old-fashioned crowd pleasers like Roasted Sausages, Peppers, and Onions are even more delicious and streamlined for quick cleanup. From cocktails to dessert, from special weekend breakfasts to quick weeknight dinners, you’ll find yourself making these cozy and delicious recipes over and over again."
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Bookshop