Links I love

Links I love

My favorite finds from around the web:

Jane Austen films and Onion headlines: a perfect match. This is fantastic.

As far as your brain is concerned, audiobooks are not “cheating.” “The TL;DR version of all of this is that as far as the mental processes are concerned, there really isn’t much difference between reading and listening to a book.”

Why you will marry the wrong person. “We seem normal only to those who don’t know us very well. In a wiser, more self-aware society than our own, a standard question on any early dinner date would be: “And how are you crazy?”” This wonderful (and weirdly optimistic piece) is the author of my favorite recent read that I just wrote about here.

The fascinating, complicated art of designing a book cover. Regarding book covers: “no matter how many times we hear an idiom telling us not to, we always, always judge.”

My favorite instagram:

when book lovers go on vacation

When book lovers go on vacation. (Follow me on instagram @annebogel.)

On the blog:

One year ago: My list of 100 dreams. “The idea is this: to help you think through how you want to spend your time (in the big-picture sense) brainstorm an unedited list of anything you want to do (or want to do more of) in your life.”

Two years ago: “Crazy” Mary Todd, and other historical myths. “History hasn’t treated Mary Todd Lincoln well. But after reading her story, I have so much empathy for her, which wasn’t the reaction I expected.”

Three years ago: What neon lycra and chapped nipples taught me about denying it gets hard sometimes. “140.6 miles is a big deal, and nobody, but nobody, denies it. But real life—even the ordinary, everyday kind that’s free of neon lycra and worries about chapped nipples—is no joke, either. Watching the Ironman reminded me that it’s okay for it to be hard.”

Five years ago: My #1 (dead-simple, can’t-believe-I-never-thought-of-it-before) lesson from Pinterest. “It took me a while to catch onto the pattern, but that realization has made a big difference in my own home.”

Have a great weekend!

more posts you might enjoy

9 comments | Comment

9 comments

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  1. Susan says:

    I always love your links, Anne! And on the topic of your Kindle Deals (thanks for doing that, by the way, I’ve snagged a bunch of good books this way!), so you’re really on a LONG waiting list at the library for these popular new books?! Our library (Chicago suburbs) will buy multiple copies of those popular books and then some of them self-destruct while they’re popular and they’ll still have a few copies left on the shelf after “everyone” has read the book. There are books that you’re on long lists for that are sitting on our library shelf! Or it’s a short list – have you gotten on your library’s “My Media Mall” to get Kindle books that way? I know you’d rather read a hard copy. I don’t buy hard copies of fiction books because I rarely reread them (I have more books than I have shelves for at this point), and I rarely pay full-price for a Kindle book. But we were early-adopters of the Kindle – we had the very first one, so we have a couple thousand Kindle books. I have a Paperwhite and two of our daughters do as well, and we all share one Kindle account and I manage it, putting books on whoever’s Kindle would enjoy that book (awkward sentence, but you know what I mean). Also, my husband has a Kindle Fire, but tried my Paperwhite, then wanted one because it’s easier on the eyes. I’m reading my Kindle more than hard copy books because I can read in bed while hubby is sleeping. 🙂

    • Anne says:

      Oh, now I’m experiencing library envy! My library has a good collection but waits for new and popular titles can be insane. I try to get on the list months before the books’ publication date whenever I can.

  2. Kitty says:

    I loved the article “Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person”. My favorite quote is, “The person who is best suited to us is not the person who shares our every taste (he or she doesn’t exist), but the person who can negotiate differences in taste intelligently — the person who is good at disagreement.” This resounds with my experience in my scant 9 years of marriage. It is more a process and learning how to negotiate with another than it is the refuge that so many romantic stories intimate. Not that it can’t be that as well, but if you expect only that, you will be sorely disappointed.

    • Jocelyn Cuckootree says:

      I also think audio is “cheating” and I still think of myself as not having read ice and fire but I listened to all the audio books repeatedly.

  3. Heather Braun says:

    In regards to the list of 100 dreams. I made a list, much of it done while also on a road trip with my husband, which got me as far along as about 60. I kept adding to it till I reached 91 and then stalled. Thanks to your reminder, I finished the list this morning, and reread the whole thing. I have completed maybe one or two (these are big, long-range dreams not a to-do list) but I am inspired to be the person I dream of being. My final “dream” is th Samuel Beckett quote, “…Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

  4. Jocelyn says:

    Where does de Botton get the ‘250’ years from in his article where he describes the Western ideal of marriage. I have been reading a lot of Victorian and Edwardian era novels and as far as I can see women (at least the upper class women who are the protagonists of these novels) had very few choices. They had to marry and they had to have children, preferably two boys (the heir and the spare). To marry well was important and determined their place and privileges in society. It rather puts me in mind of a baboon troop. Romance was for novels – not real life.

  5. Anne says:

    Anne, would you consider a post on destination bookstores? I know you’ve mentioned them here and there (like your 100 dreams list), but a bigger list would be cool. I’ve made literary pilgrimages (maybe just one pilgrimage), but I don’t think to check out the well-known bookstores.

  6. Diana says:

    I’m a fairly new following so I love when you share old posts! I started my list of 100 dreams after reading the book too but I don’t think I made it past 15…I need to work on that!

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