Black Friday deals for book lovers

Black Friday deals for book lovers

I was surprised when my husband told me that outdoor retailer REI has had a campaign the last few years to #OptOutside on Black Friday. They don’t open their stores, at all. I’m taking inspiration from them today: I’d rather be reading, and decorating the tree, and making Chex Mix with my kids than shopping. I walked to one local shop earlier this morning, and have a few online purchases I’d like to make, but today my big plans are decorating, coffee, and books.

 

If you want to do some shopping–gift giving or otherwise–or score a great bookish deal, we are running a sale in the MMD shop.

For the first time ever, classes are on sale for $10 each.

Choose from:

Book Journaling for Book Lovers
1 Hour to a Better #bookstagram
What’s your reading personality?

You can take these classes on your schedule, and watch and replay as many times as you’d like. We’ve gotten terrific feedback on all three, and know that each class can make a real difference in your reading life, whether you start today or in the new year. Choose the one that most grabs you, or snatch up all three while they’re cheap.

Journal sale

Our fabulous Leuchtturm journals are buy one, get one half off with the code BOOKMAIL. These are my very favorite journals, whether you use yours for your to-do list, deep thoughts, bullet journal, or reading log.

It’s Black Friday every day

If you’re looking for something to read, we curate a list of the best ebook and Kindle deals almost every day. You can get the latest hand-curated deals emailed to you every day by signing up right here.

As you can see below, today’s deals are particularly good (no surprise). I hope you find something great to read at a great price. (We post deals every day right here, and recommend you subscribe to the deals email for updates.)

PLEASE NOTE: Amazon says we can’t include prices on our site, but we assure you these prices are solid. (We curate based on U.S. prices; international readers can follow these steps to find deals that will always be valid in their region.) Click here to see all prices in one place, or click through the buy button on each book for details.

Garden Spells

Garden Spells

This is the book that hooked me on Sarah Addison Allen's writing. Her novels share common elements: they're Southern, small-town, and uniquely magical. The romance is cheesy, the magic impossible, but put them together and it sings. A few love scenes are a little racy (ahem). If you’re not down with supernatural food or a magical apple tree, skip this one—but you should know how many readers call this “a wonderful surprise.” A must-read for fans of The Language of Flowers. Sweet, sparkly, and thoroughly Southern. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from IndieBound
The Secret Life of Bees

The Secret Life of Bees

Author:
I love this book and finally picked up a gorgeous copy at a used book sale because I really wanted it on my personal shelves. A good story, well told, about a girl's coming of age in rural 1964 South Carolina. For better or worse, this is a timely read. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from Barnes and Noble
A Certain Age

A Certain Age

I'm a fan of Beatriz Williams. From the publisher: "Full of the glamour, wit and delicious twists that are the hallmarks of Beatriz Williams' fiction and alternating between Sophie's spirited voice and Theresa's vibrant timbre, A Certain Age is a beguiling reinterpretation of Richard Strauss's comic opera Der Rosenkavalier, set against the sweeping decadence of Gatsby's New York." More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
The Watchmaker of Filigree Street

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street

From the publisher: "1883. Thaniel Steepleton returns home to his tiny London apartment to find a gold pocket watch on his pillow. Six months later, the mysterious timepiece saves his life, drawing him away from a blast that destroys Scotland Yard. At last, he goes in search of its maker, Keita Mori, a kind, lonely immigrant from Japan. Although Mori seems harmless, a chain of unexplainable events soon suggests he must be hiding something. When Grace Carrow, an Oxford physicist, unwittingly interferes, Thaniel is torn between opposing loyalties. The Watchmaker of Filigree Street is a sweeping, atmospheric narrative that takes the reader on an unexpected journey through Victorian London, Japan as its civil war crumbles long-standing traditions, and beyond. Blending historical events with dazzling flights of fancy, it opens doors to a strange and magical past." More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Meet Cute

Meet Cute

From the publisher: "A Hollywood happily ever after where a famous heartthrob falls for his ultimate fangirl in this stand-alone romantic comedy." Readers take note: I haven't read this one, but reviewers use words like "hottest" and "sexy" which I take to mean that the racy parts do not take place behind closed doors. Recommended for fans of Jasmine Guillory's The Wedding Date and Helen Hoang's The Kiss Quotient. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Alex & Eliza (The Alex & Eliza Trilogy)

Alex & Eliza (The Alex & Eliza Trilogy)

You know the story. Ron Chernow wrote the definitive biography; now Melissa de la Cruz, author of Something In Between and Pride and Prejudice and Mistletoetells the Hamilton and Eliza story. The reviews on this are terrific. PopSugar calls it "part fact and part fiction" and Justine magazine says "Broadway fans and lovers of Melissa de la Cruz’s romance and page-turning intrigue will unite over her new book." More info →

I’m off to read now. Happy reading to you!

4 comments | Comment

4 comments

  1. Chrissie says:

    Man’s Search For Meaning by Victor Frankl is in my top five most important books of all time. Read this book if you are coping with a never ending trial. Read this book if you are in the middle of a crisis. Read this book if you are grieving. Read this book if you tend to worry about what might happen in the future. Read this book before you need it. Then, read it again once a year for good measure. Collect copies to give to people who are facing any of the above. Happiness comes and goes. What we really need and want is to find is meaning in life and in suffering. In the age of Freud, Frankl, a psychiatrist, parted ways with his hero and developed logotherapy to treat the suicidal teens in his care. He discovered that if these teens could be taught to find meaning in their suffering and meaning in life, they could get well. This was in Austria in the 1930’s. A Jew, he was given the opportunity to leave because of his renown. But he couldn’t take his parents and family so he refused to go. When he and his entire family were divided and sent to different Concentration Camps he was sent to Auschwitz where his theory was tested in unimaginable circumstances, amid suffering and loss. After being liberated, he spent the rest of his life caring for survivors. With all that, this is a hopeful book. It reminds us to be less focused on fleeting personal happiness, and dedicate ourselves to living life with meaning and purpose, in the ordinary and extraordinary.

  2. I remember reading Reading People: How Seeing the World through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel and it was really interesting especially for my psychology background. I ended up buying a few things for Black Friday especially a few books that I wanted. I am going to be looking into the other books that you mentioned because they had great plots. Thanks for the recommendations!

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