Reading Challenge: An Immigrant Story
Exit West

Exit West

Two young people meet and find love during a time of great political unrest in an unnamed Middle Eastern country. As violence simmers and then explodes into war, they survey their options and make the difficult decision to flee the city, perhaps taking advantage of the rumored doors that open almost magically into other lands, like Syria or San Francisco. An evocative story improved by the restrained element of magical realism, and strongly reminiscent of The Underground Railroad. I recommend this book to Laura Tremaine in episode 68 of What Should I Read Next. More info →
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Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand

Major Pettigrew's friends and neighbors can't believe he'd befriend Mrs. Ali, a Pakistani immigrant who doesn't understand their ways, but they bond over their common experiences and a shared love of reading. A winsome story with an unlikely hero -- a widower who was raised to believe in propriety above all falls hopelessly in love with someone who is completely wrong for him, at least by the standards of his small English village. More info →
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A Fall of Marigolds

A Fall of Marigolds

I know a lot of Susan Meissner fans, and many of those readers cite this one as their favorite. The action goes back and forth in time between two women, a century apart, who are linked by a beautiful scarf and by their unlikely survival in two devastating tragedies in New York City. Now, a woman struggles to make a new life for herself after 9/11. In the past, a woman deeply affected by the Triangle Shirtwaist Sire nurses immigrants on Ellis Island. Meissner's tone makes this an easy, enjoyable read despite the tough subject matter—I read this in a day. More info →
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The Sun Is Also a Star

The Sun Is Also a Star

$10.99$2.99Audiobook: 12.99 (Whispersync)
Yoon's latest is a YA novel with ALL THE FEELS. Daniel and Natasha meet and fall in love over the course of one whirlwind day in NYC, the day before her family is set to be deported to Jamaica; they lack the documentation to stay. In his own way, Daniel is also trapped: his Korean family has big plans for his future, plans that don't align with what he wants for himself. Yoon tackles serious issues here—identity, family, fate—but she does it with such a light touch, it almost reads as breezy. I read this in an afternoon. More info →
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Cutting for Stone

Cutting for Stone

This engrossing story combines medicine, family, and politics to great effect. Moving between India, Ethiopia, and New York City, we follow the story of identical twin brothers, born of a secret union between an Indian nun and the British surgeon she assisted. Part coming-of-age story, part mystery, part sweeping family story, this novel defies easy genre categorizations and ranks as the favorite book EVER of legions of readers. Start this book with no preconceptions because the description doesn't do it justice. More info →
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Brooklyn

Brooklyn

$10.99$4.99Audiobook: 10.99 (Whispersync)
In this quiet coming-of-age story, set just after the second World War, a young girl from Ireland's County Wexford is offered the opportunity to travel to America to settle in a a Brooklyn neighborhood that's "just like Ireland," with the assurance of an education and a good job. She had no intention of leaving home, but can't say this aloud, and so she goes. A poignant novel with homesickness at its heart, reminiscent of Betty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. More info →
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When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit

When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit

From the author of The Tiger Who Came to Tea. In this 1971 middle-grade novel, Kerr draws on her own experiences as a Jewish child in Germany: Kerr was born in Berlin, the daughter of an established German writer, but her own family fled the country in 1933 as the political situation became increasingly dangerous. A gentle and compassionate introduction to World War II history for young readers. More info →
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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

I loved this story from page 1. If you're new to this novel, brace yourself: Francie Nolan is about to win you over. Her Irish Catholic family is struggling to stay afloat in the Brooklyn slums, in the midst of great change at the turn of the century, while her charismatic but doomed father is literally drinking himself to death. But Francie is young, sensitive, imaginative, and determined to make a life for herself. A moving story of unlikely beauty and resilience. More info →
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The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

The first novel from award-winning author Díaz. Self-described "Dominican ghetto nerd" Oscar has never had an easy life. He's a misfit, an overweight Jersey-dweller who dreams of becoming the new Dominican Tolkien. But that's never going to happen, because his family is cursed. Of note: the newest audio version is read by Tony Award-winners Lin-Manuel Miranda and Karen Olivo. More info →
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Assimilate or Go Home: Notes from a Failed Missionary on Rediscovering Faith

Assimilate or Go Home: Notes from a Failed Missionary on Rediscovering Faith

$9.99$1.99
In this memoir, D.L. Mayfield recounts how living among immigrants transformed her understanding of the immigrant and missionary experiences. As a young Christian, Mayfield was determined to save the world, one soul at a time. She thought she knew exactly what they needed, and was determined to bring it right to them. But years later, Mayfield and her family settle in a neighborhood heavily populated by Somalian refugees in Portland, Oregon. As she befriends people with backgrounds radically different from her own, she experiences their immigrant lives through fresh lives, and discovers the value of knowing—and being served by—all our neighbors. More info →
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The Hundred Dresses

The Hundred Dresses

$5.99$1.99Audiobook: 2.99 (Whispersync)
Wanda Petronski is a Polish girl in a Connecticut school whose classmates make fun of her for wearing the same old dress every day. Wanda defends herself by saying she has a hundred dresses at home, but nobody believes her. When Wanda moves away, her classmates feel terrible--but it’s too late to make things right, even though they now know the truth behind Wanda's claim. A poignant, beautiful book. More info →
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The Boston Girl

The Boston Girl

$11.99$2.99Audiobook: 11.49 (Whispersync)
From the author of The Red Tent, a coming of age story about a young Jewish woman growing up in Boston at the turn of the last century. Born in America ("a real American," as her mother would say) to Russian immigrant parents, Addie's struggles are familiar to legions of children of first-generation immigrants. I like the structure of this story: 85-year-old Addie shares her life story with her twenty-something granddaughter, in response to the question "How did you get to be the woman you are today?" More info →
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Americanah

Americanah

This story centers around a smart, strong-willed Nigerian woman named Ifemelu. After university, she travels to America for postgraduate work, where she endures several years of near-destitution, and a horrific event that upends her world. She finds her way, winning a fellowship at Princeton, and gaining acclaim for her blog, called “Raceteenth or Various Observations About American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negroes) by a Non-American Black." A highlight: Adichie seamlessly weaves blog posts—about race, national identity, class, poverty, and hair—into the narrative. The novel grapples with difficult issues without becoming overwrought. I would not have read this based on the flap copy, but I was hooked from page one. Haunting, moving, incredibly well done. Terrific on audio. More info →
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Girl in Translation

Girl in Translation

When 12-year-old Kimberly and her mother emigrate from Hong Kong to Brooklyn, Kimberly quickly assumed a double life: model student by day, Chinatown sweatshop worker by night. Kwok emigrated herself as a young girl, and her own immigrant experience imbues this plucky story with the ring of truth. Participating in the 2017 MMD Reading Challenge? This could absolutely be a book you read for the cover. More info →
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The Namesake

The Namesake

In this follow-up to Lahiri's Pulitzer Prize-winning debut, Interpreter of Maladies, she tells the story of the Ganguli family. Following their arranged marriage, husband and wife travel from Calcutta to Massachusetts and struggle to become Americans. It's complicated enough when it's just the two of them, but when they have a son, the generational clash heightens the burden of assimilation—for all three of them. More info →
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Behold the Dreamers: A Novel

Behold the Dreamers: A Novel

In 2007 Manhattan, two families' lives become intertwined. Family one is that of immigrants from Cameroon: a dishwasher, his wife, and their young son. Their lives are changed when the husband scores a job as a chauffeur for a wealthy family of the 1%. But in the wake of the 2008 Great Recession, there's plenty of trouble to go around for both families. The Tenement Museum in NYC calls this a must-read immigrant story; Kirkus named it one of the best books of 2016. More info →
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Orphan Train: A Novel

Orphan Train: A Novel

$9.99$2.99Audiobook: 3.95 (Whispersync price)
In Kline's bestselling novel, an unlikely friendship blossoms in the common ground of two women's rootless childhoods. Eighteen-year-old Molly is one mishap away from getting kicked out of foster care, even before she shortly ages out. Vivian is 91, a well-to-do widow who has lived a quiet life for many decades. But as a child, she was part of a failed social experiment: she was among the thousands of young orphans, many, like her, the children of immigrants, who were shipped west to find a home with midwestern families. This story of surprising friendship and second chances is a book club favorite. More info →
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O Pioneers!

O Pioneers!

$2.24$0.60Audiobook: 7.49 (Whispersync)
I never read Cather as a student, so I'm making my way through her work now. This 1913 novel, considered by many to be her best work, shows the transformation of the Nebraska frontier—and the people who settled it—through the eyes of one woman. This is the first in a trilogy, with The Song of the Lark and completing the series. More info →
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The Light of the World: A Memoir

The Light of the World: A Memoir

$13.99$2.99
I LOVED THIS. In Alexander's words: "The story seems to begin with catastrophe but in fact began earlier and is not a tragedy but rather a love story." The author's husband died just four days after his fiftieth birthday. A few years later, Alexander looks back on their life together, their love, and the impact of that loss in her life. Her source material is fantastic: Alexander is an American, born in Harlem. Her husband was born in Eritrea, in East Africa, and came to New Haven as a refugee from war. Both were artists—and their home sounds like this amazing, vibrant, multicultural extravaganza with food and friends and music and art. I could barely put this down, and while sad, it exudes joy. Heads up for audiophiles: Alexander's narration of her own work is magnificent. More info →
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Pachinko

Pachinko

In this sweeping domestic drama, Lee tracks four generations of a 20th-century Korean family back to the time when Japan annexed the country in 1910, affecting the fates of all. Lee portrays the struggles of one struggling Korean family against the backdrop of cultural and political unrest, as they endure fierce discrimination at the ends of the Japanese. A compelling portrait of a little-explored period of history. More info →
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Little Bee

Little Bee

$11.99$3.49
I adored last summer's Everyone Brave Is Forgiven. Cleave knows how to tell a good story, and in his sophomore novel, he weaves together the lives of his narrator Little Bee, an illegal Nigerian refugee who has renamed herself to evade pursuit by the Nigerian militia, and a recently widowed Londoner. A powerful story that's not exactly easy to read. (Get your Kleenex ready.) More info →
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The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story

The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story

$10.99$0.99Audiobook: 7.99 (Whispersync)
In this memoir, Lee tells the story of her daring escape from North Korea when she was 17, and what happened after. Growing up in a town on the Chinese border, the stark contrast between the two countries was clear to young Lee. When an opportunity for escape opened, she took it, and then finally returned many years later to spirit her family away, this time to South Korea. Oprah called Hyeonseo Lee's "the most riveting TED talk ever." More info →
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Before We Visit the Goddess

Before We Visit the Goddess

I LOVED this book (and so did many of you). This novel in stories was nothing at all what I expected. The novel tracks three generations of Indian women and their fraught relationships. The title comes from a chance encounter one of these women has with a stranger, which is fitting because my favorite parts of the story deal with the small moments that change the course of a person's life, and the unlikely friendships that do the same. More info →
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The Shoemaker’s Wife

The Shoemaker’s Wife

$9.99$1.99Audiobook: 12.99 (Whispersync)
In this family saga, Trigiani's descriptive writing makes you feel you're right there as two star-crossed lovers journey from a small town in the Italian Alps to Little Italy in New York City, neither knowing the other has made the journey. Trigiani's multi-generational saga spans two families, two continents, two world wars, and nearly five hundred pages. More info →
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Love, Loss, and What We Ate: A Memoir

Love, Loss, and What We Ate: A Memoir

Lakshmi isn't a natural writer, but for many readers, her history makes up for it. Her c.v. is impressive: cookbook author, supermodel, Top Chef judge, fashion columnist, wife of Salman Rushdie. In her memoir, she reveals parts of her life that haven't been tabloid news fodder, from her recent life in NYC back to her Indian roots and their enduring significance in her life. More info →
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