Quick Lit August 2017
Three Wishes

Three Wishes

We went to Colorado last week, and I only brought two physical books with me. Our schedule was pretty packed, so I thought 700 pages would be PLENTY. I was wrong. I usually travel with my kindle for backup—in case of just such an emergency—and this Liane Moriarty title was ready and waiting for me, thank goodness. This story about three triplets was light and breezy and a little bit slapstick, a perfect airplane read. Plus after spending a week at a family reunion it was fun to read about other people's dysfunctional families. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from IndieBound
I Know This Much Is True

I Know This Much Is True

I finally finished my first Wally Lamb novel—and at nearly 900 pages, I feel like I earned it. This is the story of two brothers born into a big, messy, complicated family. One is trying to keep his own life together as he attempts to watch over his schizophrenic twin. It's an emotional and challenging read, on many levels, but I thought it was so well done, and Lamb wrote one of the best endings I've read in a long time. (I hear I should read She's Come Undone next. Thoughts?) More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from IndieBound
The Shadow of the Wind

The Shadow of the Wind

I read this as my book in translation for the 2017 Reading Challenge. This is a lifetime favorite of several readers I know with great taste, and I'm so glad I can finally see what the fuss is all about. This atmospheric novel is built around a literary mystery: who is Julián Carax, and why is someone systematically burning his books? I'll confess I had a hard time getting into it, but after I got oriented I couldn't turn the pages fast enough: I loved the post-war Barcelona setting, the rich cast of characters, and the surprising twists and turns the story took. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from IndieBound
Empire Falls

Empire Falls

Despite this being a 2002 Pulitzer Prize winner, I didn't consider reading this for myself until it was held up as an example in this writing book. I finally picked it up after a conversation with a What Should I Read Next guest pushed me over the edge. This story about a blue-collar town whose best days are behind it wasn't at all what I expected—especially the ending. I would love to talk this one over with a good book club. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from IndieBound
What to Say Next

What to Say Next

This is the only brand-new title on today's list. I adored Buxbaum's last novel, Tell Me Three Things, and when I found out she just released a new book I hopped on down to the bookstore and started reading it that afternoon. The plot line is similar: in the wake of personal tragedy, a teen can't go back to the way things were before ... which opens the door to new and surprising possibilities. I loved her characters here and didn't want to put this one down. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Audible.com
Buy from IndieBound