Quick Lit April 2020
How to Be Fine: What We Learned from Living by the Rules of 50 Self-Help Books

How to Be Fine: What We Learned from Living by the Rules of 50 Self-Help Books

I first crossed paths with Kristen and Jolenta when they appeared on episode 121 of What Should I Read Next ("The Secret" to a great self-help book"). Their podcast By the Book is a winning combination of wise and fun: to make every episode, they commit to living strictly by the rules of one self-help book for two weeks, and then gather to discuss what worked, what didn't, and what they learned. In this new book, they share what they've learned over time from following the rules of more than fifty self-help books, two weeks at a time. (They were our final guests for Stay at Home Book Tour and their session is so much fun. Watch it here!) More info →
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The Antidote for Everything

The Antidote for Everything

From the author of The Queen of Hearts, a new contemporary women's fiction set in the medical community that puts a female urologist front and center. Kimmery's novels focus not just on the practice of medicine, but the lives of the doctors' themselves, and the ethical issues they encounter that eventually affect us all. This compassionate and timely read shines a light on a topic many people (including myself) are unfamiliar with; Kimmery's concern for her fellow physicians, their patients, and her readers is evident on every page. Kimmery joined us for Stay at Home Book Tour; watch her session here. More info →
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The Address Book: What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth, and Power

The Address Book: What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth, and Power

I picked up this urban-planning adjacent book at the suggestion of multiple readers who knew of my obsession. Mask's thorough exploration of the hidden history and meanings of the street address take her all the way from ancient Rome to contemporary U.S. cities. I found this fascinating, illuminating, highly relevant, and surprisingly timely: a recurring theme in the book is the role of street addresses in identifying and stopping epidemics. More info →
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So We Can Glow: Stories

So We Can Glow: Stories

I've so been looking forward to this new release from the author of Whiskey and Ribbons, and finished it just in time for Stay at Home Book Tour. (Watch Leesa's session right here.) I thoroughly enjoyed this sophisticated short story collection, which takes the reader on quite a ride, emotionally speaking. My personal favorites are The Great Barrier Reef Is Dying And So Are We and Girlheart Cake with Glitter Frosting (I could have read ten more pages of that one!). Don't miss Leesa's acknowledgements. More info →
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The Highly Sensitive Parent: Be Brilliant in Your Role, Even When the World Overwhelms You

The Highly Sensitive Parent: Be Brilliant in Your Role, Even When the World Overwhelms You

It's no exaggeration to say that understanding what it means to be a highly sensitive person changed my life—something I've written about here on the blog and in my first book Reading People. While Aron's new parent-specific book is interesting and useful, it didn't seem to contain much in the way of new information. If you want to read just one book about highly sensitive people, I'd make it her book The Highly Sensitive Child, because it will help highly sensitive readers understand both their past and present, and will teach both highly and non-sensitive people what they need to know about interacting with the highly sensitive children in their lives. More info →
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