Books About Books and Reading
The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had

The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had

The book provides a roadmap aka The Mother of All Reading Lists for adults who long for the classical education they never had. Bauer provides numerous suggestions for reading across 5 genres—fiction, autobiography, history, drama, and poetry—as well as numerous hows and whys. This is the grown-ups’ counterpart to The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home (one of the books I read over and over again). More info →
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The Memoir Project: A Thoroughly Non-Standardized Text for Writing & Life

The Memoir Project: A Thoroughly Non-Standardized Text for Writing & Life

This slim volume (114 pages) is well worth spending an afternoon on. Memoir readers everywhere will thank Roach for her no-nonsense rules for writing your own story: you can write about anything, but just because something happens, doesn’t make it interesting. Have no fear: Roach will help you make it interesting. Entertaining and dead-practical: if you're a writer, you'll learn to write better; readers will learn to better appreciate the genre—and know how to spot a good specimen when they see it. More info →
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Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

If you’re crazy about reading, you'll recognize yourself on the pages of this essay collection. Perhaps you've experienced the pain/pleasure of merging libraries with a new spouse ("Marrying Libraries"), or utilize questionable bookmarking strategies ("Never Do That to a Book"), or self-identify as a compulsive proofreader ("Insert a Carat"--my favorite!). Smart, interesting, and laugh-out-loud funny. More info →
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Booked: Literature in the Soul of Me

Booked: Literature in the Soul of Me

The title sounds fancy and staid, but Prior had me in hysterics with her chapter that linked Thomas Hardy with her teenage attempts to lose her virginity. In this memoir, Prior opens her most beloved books to the reader. "Beloved" not because of sentiment or nostalgia, but because of the profound difference they've made in her life. Her favorites are likely to be yours, as well: Jane Eyre, Charlotte's Web, Gulliver's Travels. (Okay, so actually I know very few fellow readers who name Gulliver as a favorite—but I do love Prior's chapter on it.) More info →
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84, Charing Cross Road

84, Charing Cross Road

A must-read for bibliophiles, and you'll feel compelled to discuss the heartwarming way books bring people together with all your book-loving buddies. This is the story of the twenty-year relationship between a New York writer and a gentlemanly London bookseller, as told through their correspondence. More info →
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How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines

How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines

I love this book and am so glad I finally read it at your all's urging—this is one of those books that could change the way you read EVERY book for the rest of your life. In this short, enjoyable read, Foster explores literary symbolism in a wide variety of texts old and new: in a solid work of literature, rain isn't just rain, sex isn't just sex, a journey is more than a journey. TBR alert: he uses a wide variety of texts to show the reader what he's talking about, and if you come away with many new additions to your to-read list, you won't be the only one. More info →
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Books: A Memoir

Books: A Memoir

$15.00$4.99
Many writers have gone the memoir route to share the books that have shaped them as a writer. But Lonesome Dove author Larry McMurtry harbors a more unusual form of bibliomania—he has been a lifelong buyer, collector, and seller of antiquarian books. In these pages he traces his roots all the way from the bookless Texas home he grew up in (twenty miles from the nearest library!) to the passionate collector he is too. (That he's a passionate reader as well goes without saying.) A very interesting take on the reading life. More info →
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The Uncommon Reader

The Uncommon Reader

When an unnamed (but not well-disguised) Queen goes for a walk, her corgis stray into a bookmobile library parked near the Palace, so she feels obligated to take a book out of politeness. The Queen finds a newfound obsession with reading and begins to neglect her duties as monarch. You can read this one in a few hours, but power of reading to transform even the most uncommon of lives, and the numerous book recommendations (from Jean Genet to Ivy Compton-Burnett to the classics) will stay with you much longer. More info →
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Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home

Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home

In this book about books, author and book-lover Susan Hill resolves to spend a year abstaining from NEW book purchases and devotes herself to a new project: reading through the books already on her shelves. (I've absolutely dreamed of doing that myself.) After her year is up, she draws up a list of the 40 books she'd need for the rest of her life—not the best ever written, but the ones that mean the most to her. Heads up: Hill drops a lot of names in this book: this will either delight you or drive you insane. More info →
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Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading

Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading

You may know Nina Sankovitch as a Book of the Month judge. In her 2011 memoir, she channels Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking and embarks upon a personal reading project while grieving the death of her sister. This is extreme bibliotherapy: she resolves to read one great book, every day, for a year, so she could figure out how to live again without her sister in the world. More info →
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