30 Jane Austen-inspired books for Janeites of all ages

30 Jane Austen-inspired books for Janeites of all ages

“Ah! there is nothing like staying at home for real comfort. Nobody can be more devoted to home than I am.” – Emma

I wish I could tell Jane Austen just how much this quote rings true this summer—and that readers have been turning to her for comfort when life feels heavy. When I need a dose of Austen, I also reach for books that beautifully illustrate her stories, teach me something new about her life, or adapt my favorite Austen novels with a modern flair.

Today I’m sharing 30 titles that celebrate the vibrant wit and dependable comfort of Jane Austen in a round-up of my favorite retellings, adaptations, and Austen-inspired books for Janeites of all ages.

Join us for Austen in August

The Austen-fest doesn’t stop there: this month in Book Club, we’re continuing our tradition of Austen in August. We have a wide variety of events for readers to enjoy, whether you’ve been an Austen fan your whole life or you’re picking up her work for the first time. Join us for book talk, author interviews, and delightfully nerdy deep dives.

Our schedule looks like this:

August Book Club selection: The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner

Classics Club read-a-long: Emma by Jane Austen

August 8 at 2 pm ET Clueless watch-a-long party

August 11 at 1 pm ET  Stay at Home Book Tour: Sonali Dev

Sonali Dev will join us to discuss her new book, Recipe for Persuasion. This event is free and open to all. Get the details and sign up for updates on the Stay at Home Book Tour page.

August 19 at 7 pm ET  We’re debuting a new class called All About Emma: literary context and fun facts to enhance your Austen reading experience.

August 25 at 7 pm ET  Live book discussion with author Natalie Jenner

Get in on the action by joining the MMD Book Club, where we’re learning to read better, together. Click here to get started.

30 Jane Austen-inspired books for Janeites of all ages

30 Jane Austen-inspired books to delight and comfort contemporary readers

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Adaptations & Retellings

Bridget Jones’s Diary

Bridget Jones’s Diary

Author:
Though it might be bit dated to modern readers, I still consider this one a classic retelling. At the dawn of another New Year, Bridget Jones is 32, single, and desperate to take control of her life—so she starts keeping a diary. And such a diary. Bridget is a free spirit, fond of witty banter, enthusiastic about everything, and her enthusiasm lives on every page, where she shares her never-lukewarm opinions about everything from diet to work her love life. She may seem flighty, but she's always searching for deeper meaning. She also has great people skills. This might not be obvious when she first meets straight-laced barrister Mark Darcy, but the novel is based on Pride and Prejudice, so of course they get off to a bumpy start. More info →
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Longbourn

Longbourn

Author:
"If Elizabeth Bennet had the washing of her own petticoats, Sarah often thought, she’d most likely be a sight more careful with them." A Pride and Prejudice retelling for Downton Abbey fans: this is Austen's classic story, retold from the servant's perspective. Readers interested in the Regency era will appreciate the vivid historical detail and unique perspective in this unique retelling. More info →
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Dear Mr. Knightley

Dear Mr. Knightley

Author:
I love Reay's many nods to Emma in this novel of bookish delight. Samantha Moore spent her childhood struggling in the foster care system, relying on her favorite literary characters to survive. She even expresses herself using their words when she can't find her own. Samantha's big break comes when a "Mr. Knightley" offers her a full scholarship at the prestigious journalism school at Northwestern University. The only requirement is that Sam write her benefactor regularly to tell him about her progress. Through their correspondence, Sam begins to find her voice ... but then things get complicated. More info →
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His Good Opinion: A Mr Darcy Novel

His Good Opinion: A Mr Darcy Novel

Author:
There are countless Pride and Prejudice retellings from Mr. Darcy's point of view, and not all of them are great. This one is a genuinely good Austen adaptation, especially for Austen purists. It says close to canon while feeling fresh, doesn't shy away from Darcy's less attractive moments, and provides an inside look at his character transformation. More info →
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Eligible: A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice

Eligible: A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice

This is the fourth installment of the Jane Austen Project, which invites contemporary authors to rework Jane Austen's novels for modern times, and my hands-down favorite. Our modern tale is set in Cincinnati, where Lizzie is re-cast as an NYC-based magazine editor, Jane is a yoga instructor nearing 40, Darcy is a snooty brain surgeon, and Bingley is an ER doctor turned star of the reality show "Eligible." The purists will need their smelling salts, but Sittenfeld is no Jane Austen, and she's okay with that: her snappy writing and spirit of playfulness make this such good fun for Jane Austen fans, if you're willing to go with it. More info →
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Unequal Affections: A Pride and Prejudice Retelling

Unequal Affections: A Pride and Prejudice Retelling

After you all had been telling me to read this for YEARS, I finally listened to the audio version, which I quite enjoyed. I listened to this really fast because I wanted to find out what happens next. In this interesting twist on Pride and Prejudice, Ormiston imagines what might have happened had Elizabeth accepted Darcy's first proposal. This story focuses almost exclusively on the romance plot lines and is mostly dialogue, but I found it fun and entertaining, and—unlike so many other retellings—appreciated how Ormiston left the book's characters largely intact. More info →
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Jane of Austin: A Novel of Sweet Tea and Sensibility

Jane of Austin: A Novel of Sweet Tea and Sensibility

Readers, this new take on Sense and Sensibility was so much fun. Perhaps not great literature, but easy-reading, well-constructed, and enjoyable. In this novel, two broke adult sisters and their sweet little sister flee expensive San Francisco to set up a new tea shop in Austin, Texas. The bones of Austen's original are visible, but Lodge doesn't hew too closely to the original, to her credit. I spent a happy afternoon devouring this book. More info →
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Heartstone

Heartstone

I NEVER would have picked this up based on the cover, but this was enthusiastically recommended by the staff of Monroe, Georgia's wonderful store The Story Shop. They described it as "a completely faithful Pride and Prejudice retelling—but with dragons." This retelling hits all the familiar P&P beats, while adding familiar fantasy elements like dragon riders and warrior women and hobgoblins, and it works. Good news for Austen fans and fantasy readers: this is the first in a trilogy. More info →
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Pride

Pride

Author:
A P&P "remix" that envisions Darcy and Lizzie as two Brooklyn teens. First line: "It's a truth universally acknowledged that when rich people move into the hood, where it's a little bit broken and a little bit forgotten, the first thing they want to do is clean it up." Zuri Benitez is the second daughter of a large Haitian-Dominican family that has lived forever on their block in Bushwick. When Darius Darcy pulls up to the expensively renovated mini-mansion across the street in a blacked-out SUV, she immediately hates him and the gentrification he represents. But Austen fans know that's only the beginning of the story. Zoboi's acknowledgements gave me goosebumps: don't miss them. Hot tip: Elizabeth Acevedo narrates the audiobook, and it is incredible. More info →
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Unmarriageable

Unmarriageable

Author:
This contemporary Pride and Prejudice update is set in Pakistan, 2001, and features a modern day version of the family you know and love: the Binat family includes a sharp-witted father, marriage-obsessed mother, and five daughters. Despite the difference of centuries, it’s clear how women’s concerns are similar between Austen’s time and Kamal’s. Alysba teaches English, and in a fun opening scene she challenges her teenage students to reinterpret Austen’s famous opening line. Kamal uses her heroine’s profession—and accompanying love of reading—to explore themes of colonialism and identity; she also despite these weighty themes she keeps her tone light and sometimes irreverent. (Just wait till you hear how the Bingleys make their money!) This is, above all, a rom com—and it’s a fun one. More info →
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Ayesha At Last

Ayesha At Last

Author:
"Because while it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single, Muslim man must be in want of a wife, there's an even greater truth: To his Indian mother, his own inclinations were of secondary importance." How's this for a twist? In this utterly delightful P&P-inspired retelling, set in contemporary Toronto, Darcy becomes Khalid, a devout Muslim man whose mother is trying to marry him off. I loved the supporting cast featuring good friends, a cousin dreaming of a Bollywood-inspired wedding, an embarrassing mother, and a Shakespeare-quoting grandpa. If you're a P&P devotee, this is a delight. If you've never read the original, you can still enjoy this story about love, family, obligation, and romance. More info →
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Recipe for Persuasion

Recipe for Persuasion

Author:
This follow-up to Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors stands on its own. In this loose retelling of Jane Austen's Persuasion, Ashna is a Bay Area chef so desperate to save her family’s failing restaurant she agrees to compete on the reality tv show Cooking with the Stars. That’s where she reconnects with her first love—now a Brazilian soccer star—on live tv, for the first time since he disappeared twelve years ago on the worst night of her life. Dev puts her own spin on Austen’s classic, while highlighting the timeless themes of the original: a young woman sensitive to her family’s criticism, a disadvantaged young man with no credentials but a bright future, an unexpected second chance at first love. A sensitive, satisfying update. More info →
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If I Loved You Less

If I Loved You Less

Author:
Theodosia Sullivan doesn't see marriage in her future, but she does enjoy playing matchmaker for everyone who steps into her family's surf shop in Hanalei Bay. Sound like a familiar Austen heroine? Local baker Kini ʻŌpūnui warns Theo about her matchmaking machinations, but of course Theo presses on—until she realizes that her feelings for Kini might be deeper than just friendship. This slow burn LGBTQ romance provides a beautiful escape in a lush setting, as well as plenty of Austen-inspired charm. More info →
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Jane-Inspired Stories

First Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austen

First Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austen

Author:
Who really wrote Pride and Prejudice? That mystery drives this literary thriller, which plunges the reader into the world of first editions, secondhand books, and zealous collectors. When a young librarian discovers a document that casts doubt on Austen's authorship of Pride and Prejudice, she struggles to clear her beloved author of plagiarist charges before it's too late. Lovett flips back and forth between the time when Jane was writing her best-known story and today's desperate race to prove her innocence. Lovett's love of books permeates every page. Farfetched? Of course, but piles (stacks?) of fun for booklovers and Austen fans. More info →
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The Jane Austen Project

The Jane Austen Project

I'm not the only one who found this Jane Austen time travel novel a pleasant surprise. Producers, are you paying attention? Readers are clamoring for this to become a good Netflix series. At some unspecified point in the future, the earth's atmosphere has been destroyed, food can no longer be grown, and wormholes to the past are in constant use. So when Rachel is asked to go back in time and retrieve the finished (yes, really!) manuscript of The Watsons, she jumps at the chance. But things do not go as planned... Gentle readers, this does not read like an Austen novel, and Janeite purists will need their smelling salts. But if you love Jane Austen AND Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next series, give this one a try. More info →
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The Austen Playbook (London Celebrities)

The Austen Playbook (London Celebrities)

Author:
This book—which revolves around a Jane Austen-based tv adaptation filmed on an English estate—cemented my love of Parker's romance novels. Parker brings us back to the London theater scene by way of The Austen Playbook, a live-action TV murder mystery where viewers at home determine the outcome for Austen's beloved characters. Actress Freddy finds herself distracted by grumpy critic Griff, whose home is hosting the event. And Griff? He's distracted right back but there's a secret in their respective families' histories that might undo everything. (This series need not be read in order.) More info →
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The Jane Austen Society

The Jane Austen Society

Author:

This charming debut is sure to delight Austen fans. Jane Austen lived out her last days in the sleepy village of Chawton, and in the days just after World War II, her legacy still looms large. Times are hard, and we meet several villagers burdened with their own private sorrows, who are doing what they’ve always done: turning to the works of Austen for solace. When a local business attempts to buy the Austen property and raze her cottage, the villagers band together to preserve her legacy. At one point, a character muses that Austen’s works present “a world so a part of our own, yet so separate, that entering it is like some kind of tonic.” The same can be said of Jenner’s wonderful book.

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Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor: Being the First Jane Austen Mystery (Being a Jane Austen Mystery Book 1)

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor: Being the First Jane Austen Mystery (Being a Jane Austen Mystery Book 1)

In this fun cozy mystery, Jane Austen turns sleuth to investigate the death of her friend's husband, an esteemed Earl. Austen herself narrates her adventures in investigating through a series of journal entries and letters. I was smitten and entertained by Jane's uncanny ability to observe and judge those around her. The skills that make her an excellent novelist prove to be useful for detective work, too. More info →
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The Next Great Jane

The Next Great Jane

Author:
Jane Brannen dreams of becoming a famous author someday, just like her idol Jane Austen. When bestselling author J. E. Fairfax comes to Whickett Harbor, Jane thinks it's the perfect opportunity to ask her about the secret to literary success. When a hurricane rolls through, Jane misses her chance and gets thrown together with the author's snobby, science-geek son instead. In addition to an exceptionally annoying boy, the storm blows in bad news for Jane's future: her mother has filed for custody and intends to bring Jane back to California with her. Jane doesn't want to leave her beloved small town, so she sets her sights on finding the perfect match for her father and proving to her mother that Whickett Harbor is where she's meant to be. Full of Austen-isms and a lot of heart, this middle grade novel is sure to delight adult Austen fans, too. More info →
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Nonfiction for Janeites

The Real Jane Austen: A Life in Small Things

The Real Jane Austen: A Life in Small Things

Author:
Handwritten letter and small token of affection signify deeper themes in all of Austen's novels. In this biography-in-objects, Byrne examines the small trinkets that meant something to Jane, providing historical and biographical context to explain their significance while revealing various events of Austen's life. More info →
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Jane Austen at Home: A Biography

Jane Austen at Home: A Biography

Author:
Journey to Jane Austen's England with historian Lucy Worsley as she tells the story of Jane's life through the rooms and spaces that shaped the author's worldview. If you enjoy books with a strong sense of place, or imagining exactly where Jane wrote her famous novels, then this biography is for you. Worsely connects Jane's possessions and homes with the author's life, work, and values. More info →
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Jane Austen: A Life

Jane Austen: A Life

Author:
Nick Hornby calls Claire Tomalin the U.K.'s favorite literary biographer: "she's clever, thoughtful, sympathetic, and has a sense of the reader's attention span." For two hundred years Austen has remained one of the most popular novelists in English literature. Devoted readers keep picking her up again and again. Claire Tomalin reveals why Austen's work endures by shattering the quiet, complacent image of Jane in many readers' minds and replacing it with context of the social upheaval, romance, and travel that made up Austen's life. More info →
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Among the Janeites: A Journey Through the World of Jane Austen Fandom

Among the Janeites: A Journey Through the World of Jane Austen Fandom

Author:
I had the pleasure of participating in this year's virtual Jane Austen Festival, and read this book that has been languishing on my TBR for too long in order to prepare for my sessions. I found this deep dive into Janeite subculture to be insightful, entertaining, and surprisingly humorous. Yaffe's sense of humor shines when she discusses Jane Austen's Poisonous Bitches (two words: Lucy Steele), the history and intricacies of Austen fanfiction, and Darcy in the lake. Part journalism, part memoir, and recommended reading for Austen lovers everywhere. More info →
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Jane Austen’s Letters

Jane Austen’s Letters

Author:
If you really want an immersive Austen experience, go straight to the source: her letters. This collection of correspondence reveals insights into Jane's daily life, her friends and family, her witty musings, and her thoughts on the writing life. You don't need to be a scholar in order to enjoy Jane's untempered sass and strong opinions. Read the letters in order or flip to a random page when you need a dose of Austen. More info →
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Austen Years: A Memoir in Five Novels

Austen Years: A Memoir in Five Novels

Author:
I haven't read this one yet, but I hope to remedy that soon. I enjoyed Cohen's essay on Jane Austen's Politics of Walking. In her memoir, she writes, "about seven years ago, not too long before our daughter was born, and a year before my father died, Jane Austen became my only author." For Cohen, Austen's novels were both a comfort and a catalyst for working through her grief, grappling with life's hard questions, and living a literary life. Part memoir, part history, part love letter to Austen. More info →
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For Little Austen Fans

Emma (Cozy Classics)

Emma (Cozy Classics)

“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to united some of the best blessings of existence, and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her. . . ” In this case, Emma lives in a beautiful world made of felt, perfectly cozy in the pages of this charming board book adaptation. More info →
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Goodnight Mr. Darcy

Goodnight Mr. Darcy

Author:

Bedtime classic Goodnight Moon gets an Austenite twist in this adorable board book. Our beloved Pride and Prejudice characters appear at the Netherfield Ball in a cute parody. "In the great ballroom, there was a country dance, and a well-played tune, and Elizabeth Bennett; and Mr. Darcy surprised, by a pair of fine eyes ... And don't forget Jane with a blush and Mr. Bingley turned to mush, and a gossiping mother and father saying hush."

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Where’s Jane?

Where’s Jane?

Author:
This Where's Waldo-esque book follows Jane through ballrooms and other colorful scenes from her famous novels. Find her characters among the crows and scenery, too. Perfect as a coffee table book or on the shelf of your favorite little Janeite, this adorably illustrated seek-and-find book is a must-have for Austen fans of all ages. More info →
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Little Miss Austen: Sense and Sensibility

Little Miss Austen: Sense and Sensibility

Author:
Learn about opposites with Austen's famous sisters Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. In a series of illustrations inspired by the novel, this board book explores the differences between people, places, and things (like happy Mr. Willoughby and sad Colonel Brandon). More info →
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Little People, Big Dreams: Jane Austen

Little People, Big Dreams: Jane Austen

Learn all about the life of Jane Austen with quirky illustration and fun facts in this educational biography. From Jane's upbringing to her astounding writing career, this sweet book covers the basics and just might inspire the next great writer of our time. Perfect for gifting, for reading with a little one, or for brushing up on your own Austen trivia knowledge. More info →
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Do you have a favorite Austen adaptation? We’d love to hear your recommendations in the comments. (Go ahead and share your favorite original Austen novel, too!)

P.S. When you run out of Austen-inspired novels, enjoy these 10 comforting classics, and if you need an Austen-inspired gift for a friend (or yourself), check out the Jane Austen Gift Guide.

30 Austen-inspired books for Janeites of all ages

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68 comments | Comment

68 comments

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  1. ChristinaH says:

    How does the book version of Bridget Jones Diary compare to the movie? Despite my adoration of both P&P and Colin Firth I somehow hated that movie but I’m willing to try the book if it’s better!

    • Michelle L says:

      I think the book is very fun – its all written in short diary entries. I have to say epistolary novels are my LEAST favorite style of writing, so its saying a lot that I really love this. Bridget is a bit of an idiot though, so if that is why you didn’t like the movie, you may not love it here.

    • Alicia says:

      Bridget Jones Diary is one of the funniest books I have ever read and I often reread it for a pick me up. Better than the movie.

  2. Taryn Austgen says:

    The Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman series by Pamela Aiden is THE BEST alternate perspective retelling I have read so far and I’ve read… a lot of Jane Austen retellings and fan fiction.

  3. Emily M Kerr says:

    Just finished re-reading A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me About Love, Friendship and the Things That Really Matter by William Deresiewicz. I love this book.

    • Jeanine says:

      Yes, A Jane Austen Education is one of my favorite books ever! It really made me think and also want to read all of Jane Austen’s books!

    • Suzy says:

      I know Anne loves A Jane Austen Education, too, so I was surprised not to see it here. It’s the best, I adore it!!

      • Jeannette says:

        I loved this book as well. Found myself social media stalking the people in this true story! My daughter gave this book to several young men she has dated. Such a testimony to the power of good writing.

  4. Lauren says:

    I have read (a lot) of ‘after’ stories about Lizzy and Darcy’s life after the book ends. I really enjoyed most of them! Are there any ‘after’ stories about Emma and Knightley??

    • Suzy says:

      You are right, where are the retellings of Sense and Sensibility, Persuasion, Northanger Abbey?? And where are the After Books on them? Would love to read about Emma and Mr Knightley, my favorite couple, AFTER!

  5. Laura says:

    I love What Matters in Jane Austen? By John Mullan for a nonfiction pick- there’s so much detail that a modern reader might miss.

    • Barbara Heller says:

      I love “What Matters in Austen” too and also “What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew” by Daniel Pool. Both books are entertaining and give fascinating insights into the social customs of the time and have deepened my pleasure when reading 19th century novels.

  6. Barbara says:

    I love The Jane Austen Project and would be thrilled to see a Netflix series based on the book. I had actually written to the author several years ago when I finished the novel to ask her if there were any plans to bring her story to the screen. She generously responded and we had an enjoyable email chat!

    • Emma says:

      Absolutely! I just came on here to recommend that one. I’m currently listening to it on audio and I have to say it is excellent. Really like the alternative viewpoints to events from P&P as well as the what-happened-next element. I’ve had a go at a few before but they’ve never seemed to hit the mark – too much about the romance and not enough about society maybe? This is is fab though.

  7. Cheryl Couch-Thomas says:

    My favorite Jane Austen novel is the one I:
    a) am currently (re)reading
    b) the one I just finished (re)reading
    c) the one I will (re)read next
    d) ALL OF THEM!

    • Erica says:

      Oh, my goodness! I feel the same way! It’s hard to pick a favorite but I do find myself rereading P&P more frequently than the rest.

    • Sally says:

      Not “just” Austen, but my girls loved The Mother Daughter Book Club. One of the books is about them reading Pride and Prejudice. Othe novels they read throughout the years (each book in the series is one year and one book club book) are Little Women, Daddy Longlegs, Betsy Tacey,Jane Eyer). Fun idealic tween/teen series that remains clean. It takes them from 7th grade to 11th.

      • Elizabeth says:

        It also seems from the plot summary above that Dear Mr Knightley is actually an adaptation of Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs

  8. Erica says:

    I really like the Jane Austen mystery series. I know a lot of people complain that it’s nothing like Jane Austen, but I thought they were well done and utilized Austen’s ability to closely observe the world around her well.

    Also, Dear Mr. Knightley sounds kind of like a modern version of Daddy Long Legs. That’s definitely going on my tbr list!

  9. Saffron Garey says:

    I always think that the Joan Aiken ‘Sequels’ are little overlooked. They are both faithful and accessible. Not to mention completely delightful.

  10. Melanie Quella says:

    I enjoyed Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron by Stephanie Barron for a different take on Jane as well as Cedar Hollow Farm by Amanda Schwantes. It doesnt say so in the description but it must be based on Persuasion.

  11. Sharon says:

    Just finished Miss Austen by Gill Hornby- well written and made the Austen family seem more “real” as opposed to just historical figures

    • Michelle L says:

      I AGREE! I just finished listening to this last month. I think the author did a superior job of giving quirks to the real Austen family members that you can easily align them with her fictional characters. In my good reads review I said this the best imitation of an Austen novel that I’ve read.

  12. Sharon says:

    I need some help. I have some beautiful editions of all the Austen novels and own all the books on my kindle. However, I would like to buy all the books in paper form that I could actually read repeatably and be able to see with my 56 year old eyes. Does anybody have a good suggestion? I thought this would be the perfect group to ask!

  13. Erin says:

    For those who enjoy mysteries and are looking for “after” stories of Darcy and Lizzie, the Mr. & Mrs Darcy series by Carrie Bebris takes the reader through each Austen book/setting, but with the Darcys solving whatever mystery is posed. It even includes a book based on Sanditon, the unfinished Austen work recently adapted for television.

  14. Amanda says:

    Thank you for this list!! I re-read Emma this spring as I needed something comforting to enjoy and this list is EXACTLY what I need as these tense, uncertain times continue! I’m off to put in some library requests! 🙂

  15. Annelies says:

    So many books inspired by the works of Jane Austen! My favorite is definitely Sense and sensibility, but I liked Persuasion a lot also. I hated Emma though 😅

  16. Peninnah says:

    For a quirky spin on what it might look like if Jane were alive now, I thoroughly enjoyed Michael Thomas Ford’s Jane Bites Back. Jane is a vampire running an indie bookstore.

  17. Kitty says:

    Anne, you outdid yourself with this blog post! So much comforting goodness!!! Austen in August just became my new favorite thing. Thank you!

  18. Karne says:

    Old Friends and New Fancies (by Sybil G. Brinton) was the first Jane Austen sequel, and it smashes up the characters from all her novels. It ties up some loose ends very enjoyably!

  19. Alicia says:

    I do the Around the Year book challenge and last year 4 books was to read “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue”. So I read old = Pride and Prejudice; new = Pride; blue = Unmarriageable (with the blue cover); borrowed = Pride and Prejudice and Mistletoe. (I also read Emma and Emma by Alexander McCall Smith for two books with the same name.)
    So next year they are doing 3 books related to past, present and future. I was thinking The Jane Austen Society for present and The Jane Austen Project for future. Does anyone have suggestions on what would work better?

  20. Kind of feel like Austenland by Shannon Hale deserves to be in this mix, not because it’s so good (I’d give it no higher than three stars out of five), but because the movie it inspired is the perfect late night with girlfriends ridiculous but so fun guilty pleasure kind of watch. And also, because I kind of want Austenland to be a real thing.

  21. Laura Newton says:

    I recently read The Clergyman’s Wife, which continued the story of Charlotte Lucas once she married the ghastly Mr. Collins. I loved it because I always found her to be so interesting- after all, who marries him by choice?

  22. Sharalyn Paetz says:

    I very much enjoyed A Jane Austen Education by William Deresiewicz. It’s rare to hear from a man on Jane Austen and even rarer to have someone write what they learned about themselves through reading through each of Austen’s novels.

  23. Who could omit PAMELA AIDAN’S marvelous, well-written FITZWILLIAM DARCY, GENTLEMAN Trilogy , consisting of:
    1) “An Assembly such as This ”
    2) ” Duty and Desire”
    3) “The Three Remain
    Jane Austen’s classic novel of PRIDE & PREJUDICE is beloved by millions, but little is revealed in the book about the mysterious and handsome hero, Mr. Darcy. And so, the question has long remained: Who is Fitzwilliam Darcy? Pamela Aidan finally answers this. Setting the story vividly against the colorful historical and political background of the Regency.

  24. Anna says:

    In the YA genre, I enjoyed Epic Fail by Claire LaZebnick, a retelling of Pride and Prejudice, as well as the Jane Austen Diaries by Jenni James. Not high literature, but fun teen retellings.

  25. Deb says:

    The Other Bennet Sister by Janice Hadlow is an excellent read.
    It focuses on Mary’s story but ties in with other loved characters too.

  26. Library Mary says:

    Thanks, Anne. I’m a Janeite and a children’s librarian, so I just ordered “The Next Great Jane” from your link.

  27. No Austenland? (by Shannon Hale). lol Book and movie both are fun. Miss Austen Regrets [movie] is my favorite Jane-ish thing. I love Bridget Jones and Unmarriageable which I read and reviewed not long ago. I’m so happy you included the shout-out to Louisville’s own! It’s such a fun conference and the vital one was just amazing! Alexander McCall Smith has done a version of Emma, Joanna Trollope did Sense/Sensibility in a re-telling series, too, I wasn’t thrilled with either though I love both authors. Here’s a link to my thoughts if interested https://hopewellslibraryoflife.wordpress.com/2016/04/26/what-ive-been-reading/

  28. Jes says:

    I have an ARC right now that after reading this post, I will have to move to the top of the queue, called Jane in Love. Love reading all of the other suggestions, so many I didn’t know of!

  29. Suzy says:

    The best book I’ve read on Jane Austen herself was “Parson Austen’s Daughter” by Helen Ashton. I really enjoyed it.

  30. Courtney says:

    This list is excellent. Thank you! I’ve added so many books to my “To Read” list. A few years ago I read “By the Book” by Julia Sonneborn. It’s is a really faithful adaptation of “Persuasion” but set at a university where a professor working towards tenure finds out that her lost love is now the president of the university.

  31. Kay says:

    One of my favourite blog posts of the year, thank you. I have added several to my must read list. Jane Austen is my all time favourite writer and my absolute top book is Persuasion followed by Sense and Sensibility. I did my dissertation on Austen at university (obviously) and still have it in the loft somewhere. She is one of my comfort authors and most years I will do a reread through all of her books. I keep telling myself that I should buy myself some beautiful copies too instead of my old paperbacks which are full of university notes. I love the posts where the comments have some good suggestions as well as the actual post an you have token coming back to the post over a couple of days for extra recommendations. x

  32. Brie says:

    Love this list- thank you!
    Have you ever read “The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen” by Syrie James? It’s a beautifully written fictional story of a clandestine romance. James also wrote “The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen” and “The Secret Diaries of Charlotte Bronte.” It’s been years since I read these (maybe a decade??) but they sit in places of honor near the Austen, Bronte and Gaskell books on my shelf. 🙂

  33. Cindy says:

    The best of many P&P variations I’ve read is Seasons of Waiting by Christina Morland – wonderful interpretations of all of the characters and a beautiful, slowly unfolding reunion of E and Mr. D after 25 years of separation with detailed, dense flashbacks of key periods in those seasons apart. Also loved the movie Becoming Jane and enjoyed the first season of Sanditon.

  34. Thank you for the list of wonderful books to explore. I read Dear Mr. Knightley a few years ago and loved it!
    Thank you for participating in the virtual Jane Austen Festival this year. Not as good as the real thing but definitely worth watching and listening to!

  35. Marilyn says:

    After recently finishing “Emma” ,I have now decided that is my favorite Jane Austen book. I am almost finished reading “Lizzy & Jane” by Katherine Reay/ Than You for the list.
    Marilyn

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