20 books to cozy up with this winter

20 books to cozy up with this winter

Winter is historically not my favorite season, but there’s plenty to love about winter reading: the cold, grey days are the perfect excuse to stay inside and read. The Danish concept of hygge is still having its moment, and for good reason: it encourages us to indulge in the seasonal aspects of life by being intentionally cozy in the wintertime.

So grab yourself a cup of tea and a warm blanket, and light the candles. Then pick up one of these twenty titles set in the wintertime to bring the feeling full circle. Whether or not you expect to see snow outside your own window this year, you can experience that snowy winter weather on the page.

20 books to cozy up with this winter
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe: The Chronicles of Narnia

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe: The Chronicles of Narnia

Author:
This classic series begins with four siblings who are sent to the countryside for safekeeping during the war. In a game of hide-and-seek, the youngest discovers a fantastical world hidden in the back of an old wardrobe. There, the White Queen has cast a curse over the land of Narnia, ensuring that it is always winter and never Christmas. The children embark on an adventure full of magic, whimsy, and a fair amount of danger, aligning themselves with (and battling against) unforgettable characters all the way. More info →
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Beartown

Beartown

Author:
Beartown transports readers to a tiny community nestled deep in the forests of Sweden, where town spirit is born out of the local hockey league. It’s the community’s main source of pride and light in the face of hard times. The people of Beartown revere the game and the players, but it’s all threatened when the reputation of the star player is called into question just when the team has a big win in sight. Beartown is not just a story about sports: it’s about life, trauma, secrets, and loyalty. (Don't miss the sequel!) More info →
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Still Life (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache Mysteries, No. 1)

Still Life (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache Mysteries, No. 1)

Author:
The first installment in Penny’s Inspector Gamache mysteries, Still Life introduces Chief Inspector Armand Gamache as he investigates a murder in the small town of Three Pines, Quebec. Just as the holiday season begins, the body of a beloved community member is found in the woods, dissolving Three Pines’ peaceful façade. Several of the series’ books are set in the winter time, but if you’re new to Louise Penny, take note: you’ll enjoy the series more if you read the books in order. (Although I've gotta say I LOVED Penny's brand-new release in this series.) More info →
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The Terror

The Terror

Author:
Imagine yourself a crew member on the 1845 Franklin Expedition, searching for the legendary Northwest Passage. Now, imagine that your ship is fully surrounded by thick, unyielding ice. The men on board the HMS Terror feel trepidation at the thought of a second summer with their ship stuck in the Arctic Circle, hoping for a thaw that will allow them to continue on or go home. As time passes, their supplies dwindle, tensions rise, and the men realize that there’s something out there, a predator that they are unequipped to handle. Desperate, the men take to walking across the ice as a last attempt at survival. At 700+ pages, this novel is full of suspense and icy chills. More info →
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The Winter Sea

The Winter Sea

Carrie McClelland is an author looking for her next story when she ventures to Scotland. She settles near the ruins of Slains Castle to write, drawing inspiration from her own family history and the events of the Jacobite uprising. With parallel storylines in the 1700’s and present day, a romantic subplot, and paranormal elements, it’s no surprise that readers recommend Kearsley as an author worth binge reading. If you love The Winter Sea and want more, pick up the sequel, The Firebird. More info →
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Last Christmas in Paris: A Novel of World War I

Last Christmas in Paris: A Novel of World War I

For fans of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, this epistolary novel tells the story of a great romance. When the Great War begins, Evie believes (as do many others), that it will all be over by Christmas. As her brother Will and his friend Thomas leave for the front, they make plans to meet for a holiday in Paris when the war is resolved. As time passes, Evie feels helpless and struggles to find a way to help the cause, while Will and Thomas experience the trials and terrors of war. The letters between Evie and Thomas are candid and heartfelt. Though the title is Christmas-y, this book is actually wonderful for any time of year. More info →
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One Day in December

One Day in December

Author:
This contemporary romance is perfect for fans of holiday tales like Love Actually. Laurie thinks that love at first sight exists only in movies, until the day she looks out a bus window and locks eyes with a man who she knows instantly is the one. As the bus pulls away, Laurie feels strongly that their paths will cross again. She never expects that when they’re finally introduced, the man is dating Laurie’s best friend. Like other breakout novels in this evolving genre, this novel provides a heartwarming story with surprising depth. If you're on the hunt for a Christmas time read that isn't a Christmas story, this is it. More info →
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Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice

In this quiet novel (sometimes categorized as a romance, but don't let that scare you off), five individuals, each dealing with their own painful personal tragedy, are unexpectedly brought together during the Christmas season in the Scottish countryside—though they've decided not to celebrate the holiday; it's too painful this year. But redemption is found in surprising places, and in the midst of so much loss, love and redemption emerge. This book was a delightful surprise; I enjoyed it so much. More info →
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Greenglass House

Greenglass House

Author:
Twelve-year-old Milo is looking forward to the Christmas season, mostly because his family’s inn is sure to be relatively quiet. Milo’s plans for relaxation are interrupted when several odd guests arrive to stay at Greenglass House. Each of the eccentric guests has a story to share, and each story has a mysterious connection to the inn’s history. Milo and his friend Meddy invent a role-playing game, casting themselves as daring investigators. When some of the guests have items go missing, Milo and Meddy work together to solve the mystery of the old house. With sweet characters and an engaging plot, this is a great pick to cozy up with on a wintry night. When you’re finished, pick up the sequel, Ghosts of Greenglass House, also set over the winter holidays. More info →
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Peace Like a River

Peace Like a River

Author:
A tragedy, a romance, a coming of age story, set in the deep North Dakota winter. I had to be talked into reading this novel because the description didn't grab me, but now it's one of my favorites. File under fathers and sons, tight-knit communities, and outlaws. Book club highlight: the miracles that happen in the novel, and that happen (or not) in our everyday lives. A beautiful, mesmerizing book for fans of Wendell Berry, Marilynne Robinson, and Amor Towles. More info →
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The Snow Child: A Novel

The Snow Child: A Novel

Author:
It's Alaska, 1920, the night of the first snowfall, which inspires s typically serious couple to indulge in a bit of silliness: they build a child out of snow, just for fun. In the morning, the snow child is gone, but, in a way eerily mirrors a much-loved fairy tale, the couple spies a young girl they've never seen before running through the trees. I loved this magic-infused story about love, loss, and the wildness of nature. More info →
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The Bear and the Nightingale: A Novel

The Bear and the Nightingale: A Novel

Author:
In this reimagined fairy tale, set in medieval Russa amongst snowy landscapes and magical forests, a young girl with a special gift attempts to save her family from the evil lurking in the woods. This fantasy is well-suited for fans of books I love—Naomi Novik's Uprooted, Erin Morgenstern's The Night Circus, and anything Neil Gaiman. Two more books complete the Winternight trilogy: The Girl in the Tower and The Winter of the Witch, due out in January 2019. More info →
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Snow Falling on Cedars

Snow Falling on Cedars

Author:
This lyrical and heartbreaking first novel is set in an isolated, snow-covered Washington State island town in the 1950s, where a Japanese man stands trial for murdering a white fisherman. The trial brings the town's painful history and many citizen's long-submerged sense of guilt and shame sharply to the surface; Guterson skillfully unfolds both the history of the town and that of two star-crossed lovers layer by layer. More info →
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Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express

Author:
It was supposed to be the perfect crime. But an avalanche stops the Orient Express in its tracks just before a passenger is found murdered in his berth, foiling the perpetrator's getaway, and trapping 13 potential suspects—each with an airtight alibi—in the train car with Inspector Hercule Poirot. If you've seen the movie, take note: Branagh changes Christie's ending. Hot tip: Dan Stevens's audio narration is fantastic. More info →
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The Children’s Blizzard

The Children’s Blizzard

Author:
An unseasonably warm day in January 1888 ends in tragedy when an unexpected and violent snow storm rips through the American midwest. By the next morning, some five hundred people lay dead on the prairie. With the arrival of the meteorological catastrophe comes the end of the settlers’ belief that their new home was a perfect haven. Meticulously researched and told through the lens of five families who were greatly impacted by the storm, this will appeal to narrative nonfiction fans who enjoy reading about little-known events in American history. More info →
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The Little House Collection

The Little House Collection

Winter is the perfect time to get lost in this great series, in which the scrappy Ingalls family struggles to build a life on the American frontier. These 9 books tell the story of Laura Ingalls’ childhood and coming of age on the American frontier. Follow the Ingalls family as they move from the Big Woods of Wisconsin to the Kansas prairie, from a creekside dugout in Minnesota to the shores of Silver Lake, South Dakota. They battle the elements, kill the occasional bear, and establish a cozy domestic haven wherever "home" happens to be that year. Sometimes they struggle for their very survival. You'll wish you could pull up a chair by the fire while Pa plays his fiddle. Welcoming and homey. (The audio cds by Cherry Jones are completely wonderful.) More info →
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The Great Alone

The Great Alone

Author:
It’s 1974, and Leni Allbright’s father Ernt, a former Vietnam POW, suffers from terrifying PTSD. The family moves to Alaska in search of a fresh start, but they're utterly unprepared for the harsh reality that greets them. As Large Marge says, “Alaska herself can be Sleeping Beauty one minute and a bitch with a sawed-off shotgun the next…. Up here you can make one mistake. The second one will kill you.” But she doesn’t yet know Leni fears the violence in her home more than the landscape. As winter draws near and darkness closes in, Ernt’s mental health deteriorates, with disastrous consequences for the family and community. Yet Leni will survive—and maybe even thrive. A riveting coming of age story featuring a fabulous setting, amazing female leads, and ultimate redemption. More info →
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The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

It’s just a few days before Christmas when the five Vanderbeeker children find out their landlord will not renew the lease on their Harlem brownstone apartment. The thought of leaving the home (and neighborhood) that they love puts a damper on their Christmas spirit, but the siblings come together with a plan: convince their Scrooge-like landlord to let the family stay. This perfectly heartwarming middle grade novel with diverse characters and a charming setting will bring home the spirit of the season into your home. Don't miss the sequel, The Vanderbeekers and the Hidden Garden. More info →
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In the Midst of Winter

In the Midst of Winter

Author:
In Allende's latest novel, a traffic accident caused by a horrible Brooklyn snowstorm gets the ball rolling, bringing three very different people together to carry out a common mission. As they travel together through the frozen landscape, each character's story is revealed, as Allende takes us from present day New York City to recent events in Guatemala to forty years ago in Chile and Brazil. Not my favorite Allende, but she sure makes you want to know what happens next. More info →
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All the Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See

Author:
A captivating story, well-told. The characters in this war novel are fascinating and altogether unexpected, and the book’s setting couldn’t be lovelier: much of the action takes place in Saint-Malo, France, a unique walled port city on the English Channel. It doesn't feel overlong: its 500+ pages give Doerr plenty of room to build a believable world, and give his characters depth and feeling. An intelligent, detailed, literary novel that will stay with you long after you turn the last page. More info →
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What are your favorite cozy reads? Tell us all about them in comments!

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90 comments

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  1. JenCanRead says:

    I’m going to respectfully disagree about The Great Alone being a winter pick. I think it NEEDS to be read in the summer, where there is light and growth and warmth! The dark content in such a dark season could be so bleak. Absolutely fantastic book though, one of my favorites this year.

  2. I loved THE SNOW CHILD. I thought it was such an original story, set in the Alaskan frontier with this folkloric child seemingly come to life. Magical realism at its best!

    THE WINTER SEA sounds really good. Anything set in Scotland already has my heart, and add in some romance and paranormal stuff? Sold!

    Thanks for the recs!

  3. Renee says:

    Thank you!!

    I’ve read a few of these already but I’m always looking for good seasonal “reads” especially in winter when I love curling up with a book and an early bedtime, ideally after a day spent skiing (bliss).

  4. Kari Sweeney says:

    I see many favorites on this list plus some new ones to try.

    I absolutely adored The Vanderbeekers of 141st St. I am not typically a crier when I read, but that story made me tear up. In the best way. It was heartwarming and just so wonderful!

    • Edie says:

      Thanks for recommending this, Pauline. I’ve been wanting to try Anita Shreve’s books for a while so after your comment I thought I’d give this one a shot. I’m thoroughly enjoying this novel and, yes, it’s perfect for winter. I will also be reading more of her books in the future. Thank you!!

  5. Lisa says:

    I’d like to add “Spinning Silver” by Naomi Novik to the list! Perfect if you loved her book, “Uprooted,” and also good for fans of “The Bear and the Nightingale.”

  6. Janean says:

    Such a great list, Anne! I love winter and winter reading. I would highlight The Long Winter from the Little House series as a favorite. I always try to read A Christmas Carol and, last year, I paired it with Mr. Dickens and His Carol. Little Women and most of Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series feel like a winter reads to me.

  7. Carrie says:

    Love “The Winter Sea!”(and all Susanna Kearsley-Bellewether was so captivating). I read it around Thanksgiving at my parents’ house in Michigan and it is the perfect cold weather book. Doesn’t hurt that I absolutely adore Scotland. 🙂 “Named of the Dragon” is another good winter Kearsley book. It takes place around Christmas in Wales.

  8. Jessie says:

    Oh you goodness—I just added SO many books to my TBR list! A lot of these sound like a fabulous way to make it through a Colorado winter. I absolutely loved Greenglass House, and can’t wait until my daughter is old enough for me to read it to her.

  9. Sarah says:

    I read and loved Greenglass House on the recommendation of last year’s list, and just finished the sequel over the Thanksgiving holidays (perfect, since we had snow.) Maybe it’s time to pull out another winter read.

  10. LoriAngela says:

    My Mom reads Winter Solstice every December. I have enjoyed many of these books a few are on my shelf. May I suggest Late Nights On Air ny Elizabeth Hay and Forty Words for Sorrow by Giles Blunt. Canadians know about winter.

  11. KG says:

    James Herriot’s books are cozy winter reads in the memoirs line, starting with All Creatures Great and Small. A new young vet arrives in 1930s Darrowby, survives his first encounter with his manically engaging boss, and falls in love with his surroundings and a local girl. Lots of being called out in the middle of freezing slushy nights to tend farm animals in distress, lots of awkward situations, lots of camaraderie and heart.

    Being Mortal by Atul Gawande is non-fiction but a terrific read for winter.

    A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles was also great. What can you do when you’re confined, kind of like being snowed in for the winter?

  12. Sarah says:

    I read “The Dark is Rising” by Susan Cooper every winter. Not the whole series, just that one book.
    I just finished Still Life a few days ago–my first Louise Penny! And I loved The Greenglass House and The Bear and the Nightingale–I agree, they are both excellent choices for cozy winter reads.

  13. Susan Toscano says:

    This is truly a wonderful list. One book that I loved which is not listed is Snow Day by Billy Coffey, one of favorites to read each year at this time.

  14. Kate says:

    This added a bunch to my list, thanks! Forgot I had already downloaded The Winter Sea – just moved that up higher on my TBR list. 🙂

    Just wanted to note that the Little House books are problematic in their portrayal of Native Americans. If you read Deb Reese’s blog – American Indians in Children’s Literature – she covers this in a lot of detail. It’s tricky, as many of us loved those books as children, but when read with a more critical (and adult) lens…there are major flaws.

    I’m not trying to be a hater, I love your work! I’m an elementary school librarian, so this is something I think about a lot, and when I saw it listed, just felt I should share.

    Thanks for the great post!

    • Lynette says:

      Have you read the children’s series by Louise Erdrich, starting with The Birchbark House? The novel follows an Ojibwa girl and her family and their way of life, in the late 1800s. You follow the family legacy through the series. I loved reading it as an adult, and my children were enthralled as well.

  15. I read Murder on the Orient Express last winter and really enjoyed it. It is definitely meant to be read in the winter; it would feel wrong to read it in the summertime! I would add Sherry Thomas’ latest book in her Lady Sherlock series, The Hollow of Fear. There’s something about a cozy mystery that needs to be read by a fire.
    I plan to start War & Peace this winter, not necessarily because of the season, but because I tend to read longer books in the winter and leave shorter, faster-paced books for summer reading.
    My husband just read The Terror and absolutely loved it. He cannot stop talking about it. AMC did a miniseries on it that he watched after he read it, if anyone wants to watch that.

  16. Rhonda says:

    I’m excited that I have several of these titles either on my kindle or in print form, stocked up for winter. And a couple of these are on my wish list, The Bear and the Nightingale being one – unfortunately I can never get it on sale in Canada for my kindle. I’m intrigued by the Susanna Kearsley one, love magical realism such as Alice Hoffman and Neil Gaiman. And will definitely put The Snow Child on my tbr list! Great list.

  17. The Bear and the Nightingale is the most atmospheric wintery magical book I’ve read of late. Im OBSESSED with the series (reading an ARC of the last book right now, and it holds up well!) and have been recommending it to anyone who will listen for the past year!

  18. Val says:

    I just discovered The Seven Sisters series by Lucinda Riley. If you want some books that will help you while away some long winter nights (and maybe take you into the wee hours of the morning!) here’s your answer. I can’t believe I’d never heard of this author before!

  19. Christi says:

    This is so timely for me. I was just lamenting last night that I couldn’t find the right book to read. I want something that I can immerse myself in with a cozy, wintery feel. I wanted a Kearsley-type book because I’ve read all of hers, but was having a hard time finding something. Your list has a few titles I haven’t read that look intriguing. Will try Snow Falling On Cedars and One Day in December. I just finished Kate Mortenson’s the Secret Keeper which was a decent winter read. I love Susannah Kearsley and I loved the Snow Child.I think the Vanderbeeks and Greenglass House will be good as read alouds during winter break for my son. Off to start reading now!

  20. Mary Huff says:

    I’ve read a few of these already at your suggestions, but I will definitely try to find a couple here, the Last Christmas in Paris sounds very good. I read All The Light We Cannot See last year, it was the best book I read all year! I loved it and this is unusual for me as I read lots of biographies, history, and such. I just finished Becoming Dallas Willard, an excellent book if you are a Dallas Willard fan, which I am. Thanks for helping to expand my reading life! Loved I’d Rather Be Reading as well. Giving it as gifts this year for Christmas!

  21. Loved many on this list–The Snow Child and Winter Solstice, in particular. I also love The Christmas Letters by Lee Smith, which is one of the few books I reread almost every year. (And I just noticed it is $1.99 right now on Kindle if you are interested, although it is a sweet little book to hold in your hands.)

  22. Amanda says:

    Thanks for this great list – winter is my favorite seasonal setting!! I highly recommend The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater. It is YA, which I don’t usually like to read, but this book is the front-runner for my favorite book of the year! It takes place in November, is highly atmospheric and is a spell-binding story.

    On the other hand, The Bear and the Nightingale is one of my least favorite books of the year. I wanted to love it because of the fully realized winter setting and the beautiful cover art. I am still not able to articulate clearly what I didn’t like about it, and even tried (and failed) to convince myself to read the second one! Just curious if anyone else felt the same way about it. It should have hit my book ‘sweet spot’ but missed the mark considerably.

    • Lisa says:

      Hi Amanda–I did feel like there was something holding me back from flat out loving The Bear and the Nightingale–but I went ahead and read the second book and loved it! I felt like it was everything I wanted TBATN to be. It almost seemed like the first book was just set up for the meat of the story. I’m really hoping the 3rd book is as good or better than the 2nd! Also, if you like that type of story, I suggest checking out Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik. I liked that one better than TBATN.

      P.S. I’ve read The Scorpio Races too and loved it!

      • Amanda says:

        Lisa, my kindred book spirit, thank you so much for validating my feelings! I will definitely get Spinning Silver from the library and maybe reconsider the second book in TBATN trilogy based on your comments. 🙂

  23. Janene Misak says:

    I just started Beartown this morning – at your recommendation from another blog or podcast. Now, I added One Day in December and Last Christmas in Paris to my holds list at the library! Thanks for the great suggestions!!

  24. I live in the Midwest and hate the cold weather. I want winter to be over already! 🙂 That being said, I’m loving this list.

    For an easy lighthearted read, go for Winter Wonderland by Belinda Jones. I read it one January after visiting Quebec the previous July. It made me look at it in a whole new light… and made me yearn to visit in WINTER! I think it is a great read after the hustle of the holidays is over.

  25. Rachel says:

    Great list! Reading books that take place during the current season is something I didn’t make an intentional effort to do until the last few years, and I’ve found that it really adds something special to the reading experience 🙂

    I would add The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGuin (which takes place on the planet Winter, of course) to this list. My book club just finished it, and I was diving in during our first cold snap of the year. It really enhanced the whole setting for me!

  26. Ruth O says:

    I love and reread Winter Solstice every December (well, started a little early this year, but so did winter in Ohio!)! I also love Peace Like a River, just haven’t reread it as much. Added several to my TBR list as well. Thank you! Sigh… it’s way too easy to wrap in a blanket and read when there are so many things I ‘should’ be doing…but that’s great downtime too.

  27. Karen says:

    I’ve read several on this list. I’m currently reading The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe aloud with my daughter right now and enjoying it immensely! I’ve read Peace Like a River and Snow Child and liked them both. And I actually have Greenglass House and The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street on my shelf!

  28. Jackie says:

    “Winter’s Tale” by Mark Helprin was my 2018 winter read. I’m originally from upstate New York and am happy to say that it only bears a slight resemblance to the way it’s depicted in this book! “Snow Child” was my 2017 winter read and I loved it! I’m planning to read “Bear Town” by Frederik Backman this year. I read his short novel, “A Deal of a Lifetime” earlier this year and really like his style of writing.

  29. Lee Hillhouse says:

    I love A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains by Isabella Bird. She is an Englishwoman who travels through the mountains in Colorado in the winter of 1873. I read it every year.

  30. Eva says:

    Thank you so much for these recommendations!! I still have The Great Alone on my list and now I feel like there’s 20 new books I need to add to my library queue. And I like winter only because it allows me to be maximum cozy for a few months 😉

    Eva | http://www.shessobright.com

  31. Sheila says:

    Like a lot of these. Really tried to like Beartown because I enjoyed Ove…but after struggling through over 200 pages I abandoned it. I don’t know if it has a happy ending but what I did read totally depressed me. Guess I prefer happier escapes when it comes to books.

  32. Kara says:

    I have 17 of these! It seems I am very attracted to cozy winter reads, no matter what time of year it is! Now, which one to read first??

  33. Hildred Sullivan says:

    Terrific list! I tell everyone I know about Louise Penny’s wonderful Chief Inspector Gamand series. Such engaging characters. If I didn’t hate the cold winter I would want to live in Three Pines! Perfect for binge-reading.

  34. Melanie Handley says:

    I’m surprised that no one else mentioned reading The Gentleman from Moscow. While not what I expected, I think it may be one of, if not the, favorite book I’ve read (so far). It was beautiful, sad, great character development and, when I finished, I had to sit quietly (as in speechless) for awhile. And, while not intentional, it was during Winter/Christmas that I read it.

    • Leslie says:

      Melanie, I am in my mid-60s and A Gentleman in Moscow is the best book I have ever read. When it was over, I hugged the book to my chest and cried.
      I did notice that KG also recommended “Gentleman” in a post on 11/28.

  35. Janna says:

    Loved so many of your suggestions! I love anything written by Rosamunde Pilcher–September, The Shell Seekers, but unfortunately Winter Solstice was the last book she has written–a fantastic author!

  36. Susan Toscano says:

    A favorite is The Gift of the Deer by Helen Hoover, illustrated so beautifully by her husband. Living in a remote cottage in Minnesota, a wounded deer comes to them. They nurse him back to health and over the next four years, the deer (Peter) brings his offspring and their offspring.These deer were not pets but the Hoovers did their best to keep them safe from hunters and supplied with food for the harsh winters. Nature lovers will embrace this book.

  37. I’ve got a couple of cozy reads of my own — MAY B., which is set on the 1870s Kansas frontier in the midst of a blizzard, and JASPER AND THE RIDDLE OF RILEY’S MINE, which takes place during the 1897 Klondike Gold Rush. BRRR! 🙂

  38. Katherine says:

    The Snow Child is one of my absolute favorites! I didn’t love “The Great Alone,” but I really wanted to. Instead, Kristen Hannah’s “Winter Garden” is a wintery novel with a bit of history and a great mother/daughter storyline. It’s also sad, but less traumatic than “The Great Alone.”
    I love to reread “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott at this time of year! A great pairing for LW is “March” by Geraldine Brooks. Also, second Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”
    I’m planning to also curl up with the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy again this year, just for something lengthy and adventuresome. I may have to reread “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” first!

  39. Jennifer Gibson says:

    Several of these are on my December/winter list! I have Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah, Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg, and The Autobiography of Santa Claus by Jeff Guinn.

  40. BarbMae says:

    Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing. Definitely need to be snuggled under a warm blanket when you read this true story about his expedition to Antarctica. Great read!!

  41. Becky says:

    Yes to The Great Alone! I started reading it recently and I can’t put it down. It would be a perfect book to curl up with next to a fire with a blanket and a cup of tea. Any other Kristin Hannah lovers out there with a recommendation of which of hers to read next? I’ve already read and loved The Nightingale.

    • Mary Huff says:

      Every one of Kristin Hannah is good, but personally I think her best is Night Road. But be prepared, it will make you made enough to throw the book across the room, but when you go pick up you have to see how it ends.

  42. Catharine Sowerby says:

    What a lovely list for prompting memories of some favourite reads (Snow Falling on Cedars in particular) and suggesting some future reads. It also meant I spent a few minutes coming up with my own suggestions (not on this list) and would suggest: EM Aldmedingen’s “Little Katia”, Rose Tremain “Music and Silence”, Celia Eckback “Wolf Winter” and Harry Thompson “This Thing of Darkness”.

  43. Edie says:

    I also loved Eowyn Ivey’s To the Bright Edge of the World, which would also be a great winter read. She’s a fantastic author.

    Question about The Great Alone. I’ve debated reading this but my first and only Kristen Hannah read was Winter Garden and I didn’t care for it. Are they similar?

  44. Georgia says:

    One Day in December is a new favorite. I could not put it down and the characters really are so warm and relatable, especially when they make decisions that you really wish they wouldn’t.

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